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June 21, 2022

Patrick Schwarzenegger (MOSH) - Why he's creating the tools for a "mindstyle" lifestyle, why he co-founded a brain bar brand and how he got into angel investing in health and wellness brands

Patrick Schwarzenegger (MOSH) - Why he's creating the tools for a "mindstyle" lifestyle, why he co-founded a brain bar brand and how he got into angel investing in health and wellness brands

My guest today is Patrick Schwarzenegger, CEO and cofounder of Mosh. Mosh is a brain wellness brand co-founded by both Patrick and his mom, Maria Shriver. They’re on a mission to change the conversation about brain health through food, education, research and providing the tools for a "mindstyle" lifestyle. Patrick is also an actor, angel investor in a number of health and wellness brands. We discuss what attracted him to innovation within health and wellness, how he became interested in investing, what he looks for in companies and the founding story of how he and his mom founded Mosh. Without further ado, here’s Patrick.

  1. What was your initial attraction or introduction to investing in consumer brands and consumer technology?
  2. How would you describe your due diligence process as an investor?
    1. What’s your process for discovering new brands and having a pulse on the latest trends? Do you consider to be more top-down or bottom-up?
    2. What are trends within CPG that you’re particularly excited about and a trend that you think is maybe past its prime or no longer special?
    3. Is there any common threads that you’ve seen when it comes to what makes a successful founder or company? KPIs that stand out?
    4. How early do you typically write a check in a company?
    5. For your investments that didn’t work out. What tended to be the reasons why the companies failed?
    6. What were your takeaways from Expo West?
  3. How do you spend your time? You’re a CEO, actor, active angel investor, how do you juggle it?
  4. How do you also think and analyze brands that are co-founded by celebrities and people of influence?
  5. How did you found Mosh with your mom, Maria?
  6. What was the pain point you both wanted to solve?
  7. How did you approach building the product?What’s the goal of the brand?
  8. Currently, you’re only selling online. Are we going to see Mosh in retail channels? How do you think about what the right channels should be for Mosh?
  9. How do you juggle being CEO and also an actor?
  10. What’s one thing you would change about the fundraising process or venture capital?
  11. What’s one book that has inspired you personally and one book that has inspired you professionally?
    1. Number one book - Atomic Habits
  12. What’s the best piece of advice that you’ve received?
  13. What’s one piece of advice that you have for founders?
Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:12.400 --> 00:00:16.920 Hello and welcome to the consumer VC. I am your host, Michael, 2 00:00:17.160 --> 00:00:20.960 and on this show we talked about the world ad venture capital and innovation in 3 00:00:21.000 --> 00:00:25.480 both consumer technology and consumer products. If you're enjoying this content, you could 4 00:00:25.480 --> 00:00:30.679 subscribe to my newsletter, the consumer VC DOT substackcom, to get each new 5 00:00:30.679 --> 00:00:34.920 episode and more consumer news delivered straight to your inbox. Our guest today is 6 00:00:34.960 --> 00:00:39.840 Patrick Schwarzenegger, CEO and Co founder of Mash. Mash is a brain wellness 7 00:00:39.840 --> 00:00:43.520 brand co founded by both Patrick and his mom, Maria Schreiber. They're on 8 00:00:43.520 --> 00:00:48.600 a mission to change the conversation about brain health through food, education, research 9 00:00:48.600 --> 00:00:53.799 and providing the tools for a mind style lifestyle. Patrick is also an actor 10 00:00:53.840 --> 00:00:57.600 and active angel investor in a number of health and wellness brands. We discuss 11 00:00:57.679 --> 00:01:00.960 what attracted him to innovation within health and wellness, how he became interested in 12 00:01:00.960 --> 00:01:04.920 investing, what he looks for in companies and the founding story of how he 13 00:01:04.959 --> 00:01:08.680 and his mom found in Mash. But that further ado. Here's Patrick. 14 00:01:15.319 --> 00:01:19.239 Patrick, thank you so much for joining me today. How are you? 15 00:01:19.760 --> 00:01:22.799 I'm doing great, man. Thank you for having me on. It's a 16 00:01:22.840 --> 00:01:26.640 pleasure. It's a pleasure. Want to talk a little bit from like very 17 00:01:26.640 --> 00:01:33.359 beginning. What was your initial attraction or introduction to investating consumer brands and Consumer 18 00:01:33.480 --> 00:01:37.319 Tech? I've been doing investing in kind of the CPG better for you, 19 00:01:37.359 --> 00:01:41.920 helping well in the space, for just over a decade now, about twelve 20 00:01:42.000 --> 00:01:46.760 years. I started early, that sixteen was my first investment, and actually 21 00:01:46.799 --> 00:01:49.840 fifteen, and that really just started out of me being a struggling consumer. 22 00:01:49.879 --> 00:01:53.920 You know, I grew up in a household where my parents didn't allow the 23 00:01:53.959 --> 00:01:59.120 cocoa puffs or pop tarts or apple scrudle cakes and you know, we weren't 24 00:01:59.200 --> 00:02:02.480 drinking soda and we weren't our pantry was the Lamest by far on the block. 25 00:02:02.680 --> 00:02:06.359 So when I would go over to my friend's houses and everything, I 26 00:02:06.400 --> 00:02:09.439 would always just scavenge and eat all their different foods that they would have because 27 00:02:09.479 --> 00:02:13.039 it was so delicious. But as I got older, I got more, 28 00:02:13.080 --> 00:02:16.759 you know, informed on on nutrition and ingredients and you know, all these 29 00:02:16.759 --> 00:02:21.240 different things, and so did other Americans and my kind of made it my 30 00:02:21.319 --> 00:02:24.319 goal and one of my passions and stuff in life was to go out there 31 00:02:24.360 --> 00:02:29.719 and find these healthier alternatives, go out there and and find entrepreneurs that were 32 00:02:29.719 --> 00:02:32.840 dedicating their lives towards creating a mission of a healthier America, and I decided 33 00:02:32.879 --> 00:02:37.400 to put kind of my money where my mouth was and invested different entrepreneurs that 34 00:02:37.439 --> 00:02:40.639 were barking on that journey and that were providing Americans with less sugar and more 35 00:02:40.639 --> 00:02:45.280 protein and trying to do so without sacrificing, you know, price, flavor 36 00:02:45.319 --> 00:02:46.879 and taste. So, you know, our first company would did was one 37 00:02:46.879 --> 00:02:51.520 called blaze pizza, which was trying to be the more transparent and healthier dominoes 38 00:02:51.560 --> 00:02:53.199 and allowed, you know, the customers to go down the island choose the 39 00:02:53.319 --> 00:02:58.319 ingredients and know where they were from and all this different stuff. And and 40 00:02:58.560 --> 00:03:01.319 one thing led to another and and I really started to see these these customers 41 00:03:01.319 --> 00:03:06.800 come in and demand different products. They no longer wanted the disshunty water. 42 00:03:06.960 --> 00:03:09.039 They wanted to be on or smart water, or they never they didn't want 43 00:03:09.080 --> 00:03:15.680 the just the Pellogreno. They wanted these lacroix and they didn't want the the 44 00:03:15.759 --> 00:03:19.520 lays chips. They wanted debate stuff. So that's when I kind of sold 45 00:03:19.520 --> 00:03:23.439 out a Blazon and decided to create my own fund that specifically folkus and better 46 00:03:23.439 --> 00:03:25.680 for you health of wellness. That's amazing. And how do you think about 47 00:03:25.680 --> 00:03:30.199 in kind of where natural products now is kind of gone mainstream and better for 48 00:03:30.240 --> 00:03:34.759 you is kind of gone mainstream and there's been this such progression that you know, 49 00:03:34.840 --> 00:03:38.759 kind of the masses really are trying to pay attention to the nutrition and 50 00:03:38.800 --> 00:03:42.400 the ingredients behind what they're they're eating and drinking. I would let the kind 51 00:03:42.400 --> 00:03:45.120 of hear your perspective. Since you were pretty early, you've been doing this 52 00:03:45.159 --> 00:03:47.479 for ten years now. How do you think about how the market has changed 53 00:03:47.479 --> 00:03:53.360 and has your diligence process change at all as you're valuing opportunities? The market 54 00:03:53.400 --> 00:03:57.199 is completely changed. I mean the saturation, the amount of companies that are 55 00:03:57.280 --> 00:04:01.759 joining the the market place is tenfold. I mean, it's completely change and 56 00:04:01.800 --> 00:04:04.439 that's going to change the amount of exits. That's going to change the amount 57 00:04:04.439 --> 00:04:09.000 of success rate. That's going to change everything and it's you know, there's 58 00:04:09.039 --> 00:04:11.960 pros and cons right. I mean the the pro is that, you know, 59 00:04:12.039 --> 00:04:15.360 in this great country of America, anybody feels that they're they have the 60 00:04:15.400 --> 00:04:17.040 ability to go out there and create their own company and if they have an 61 00:04:17.079 --> 00:04:20.920 idea or see a an issue out there or a problem, they can make 62 00:04:20.959 --> 00:04:24.720 it a solution, you know, and they can go out there and create 63 00:04:24.759 --> 00:04:28.920 a company. The problem is that there are so many companies now. I 64 00:04:28.959 --> 00:04:30.040 mean even if you go to the mark it and you go to the whole 65 00:04:30.040 --> 00:04:34.279 foods or whatever, there's there's no longer a few options for every segment in 66 00:04:34.279 --> 00:04:39.279 the market place. There's there's ten, there's twenty different options. Customers are 67 00:04:39.279 --> 00:04:43.519 getting confused. There's just so much competition with the web being created, with 68 00:04:43.560 --> 00:04:47.160 the direct consumer landscape. So it's completely shifted and I think we've seen that 69 00:04:47.199 --> 00:04:51.759 because custom you know, entrepreneurs, have seen that that larger corporations are buying 70 00:04:51.920 --> 00:04:57.360 companies. You know that they can't innovate, they can't do things scrappy like 71 00:04:57.399 --> 00:05:00.319 other entrepreneurs can. Anytime there's competition, that means it's a hot market and 72 00:05:00.319 --> 00:05:04.240 it's something that's intriguing. So people have entered it. Yeah, I know, 73 00:05:04.519 --> 00:05:10.079 definitely. Obviously now competition is so much fiercer than it used to be 74 00:05:10.120 --> 00:05:13.199 and there's not as maybe maybe wide up in markets or maybe have to get 75 00:05:13.240 --> 00:05:15.360 more creative. I mean it's only better for the consumer, right. Obviously, 76 00:05:15.399 --> 00:05:18.720 more option available to them if they for example, did want to go 77 00:05:18.759 --> 00:05:23.279 like gluten free or dairy free or just have like a bit of a change 78 00:05:23.360 --> 00:05:27.560 in lifestyle that you're seeing so many consumer at least try. And so I 79 00:05:27.639 --> 00:05:30.480 think that it's way interesting. I know that xos was like, you know, 80 00:05:30.519 --> 00:05:32.920 a month ago and I saw on the Linkedin Post that you were there. 81 00:05:32.959 --> 00:05:39.040 What was kind of your reaction at expo in terms of maybe developing trends 82 00:05:39.160 --> 00:05:42.879 or, you know, maybe just thinking that okay, maybe these bits of 83 00:05:42.920 --> 00:05:46.759 the categories already pretty saturated. Yeah, it's weird. This is like well 84 00:05:46.759 --> 00:05:49.079 even you know, it's the first sex post into over two years, right. 85 00:05:49.120 --> 00:05:53.480 My first time going was about four years ago, you know. And 86 00:05:53.519 --> 00:05:55.879 again, I've been in this health and wellness, in the CBG, food 87 00:05:55.879 --> 00:05:59.959 and besspace for over a decade. Every year there was something kind of new. 88 00:06:00.160 --> 00:06:01.879 Right. There was like, Oh my God, they're they're finding ways 89 00:06:01.959 --> 00:06:06.720 to make rice and Posta less CARBI, or they're they're adding protein. It's 90 00:06:06.720 --> 00:06:10.199 what they're making, you know, it out of peas and stuff. They're 91 00:06:10.240 --> 00:06:13.519 making, you know, pizza out of cauliflower now or, Oh my God, 92 00:06:13.560 --> 00:06:15.720 what's this thing called cold brew? Oh, Keto's a huge thing. 93 00:06:15.800 --> 00:06:19.279 High protein now it's low sugar, Allu those a RITHRO. Everything is kind 94 00:06:19.279 --> 00:06:23.600 of had it this year. I honestly don't know what it was I'd I 95 00:06:23.600 --> 00:06:26.399 honestly don't know what it was. I mean I think it was just a 96 00:06:26.480 --> 00:06:30.480 continuation of the alt meat kind of thing and every every other booth was like 97 00:06:30.519 --> 00:06:36.600 a plant based chicken nugget, chicken wing, chicken tender, chicken thigh, 98 00:06:36.720 --> 00:06:41.279 chicken heart, chicken liver, chicken whatever, and then there was like all 99 00:06:41.560 --> 00:06:46.759 milks and all creamers and all ice cream and are all dairy and all you 100 00:06:46.759 --> 00:06:49.639 know. But to me it's tough because everyone wants to be the beyond meat 101 00:06:49.759 --> 00:06:54.399 and the impossible of the meat category, about doing it for dairy or milk 102 00:06:54.480 --> 00:06:58.560 or vegetables or whatever, and I just don't know how well that's going to 103 00:06:58.560 --> 00:07:01.639 work or not. And the other main issue I have is that these companies 104 00:07:01.680 --> 00:07:05.959 are raising at valuations as if they are beyond me, as if they've already 105 00:07:06.480 --> 00:07:10.360 had the proof of concept, have the revenue, had that and there are 106 00:07:10.480 --> 00:07:15.759 first to market. But it's not like that anymore. So I'm most likely 107 00:07:15.839 --> 00:07:20.199 it's the diligence and investing is going to completely shift for me because I think 108 00:07:20.199 --> 00:07:24.399 that there's going to be a complete correction with these different companies. I just 109 00:07:24.439 --> 00:07:28.920 don't see it the the returns, the rose to return, worth it right 110 00:07:28.920 --> 00:07:31.839 now. Yeah, totally. Just as you say, taturation or even you 111 00:07:31.879 --> 00:07:35.319 know, do consumers even want this? Trying to imitate me be a particular 112 00:07:35.319 --> 00:07:39.800 part to a chicken, for example? Yeah, and I'm involved with companies 113 00:07:39.839 --> 00:07:41.800 like that, you know. So I shouldn't say it's all. You know, 114 00:07:41.839 --> 00:07:44.759 I'm heart of nugs, I'm part of simulate that, but I did 115 00:07:44.800 --> 00:07:47.920 that over two years ago and at that time it was super exciting and you 116 00:07:47.959 --> 00:07:51.800 know, that was before the beyond. You know, they're their IPO and 117 00:07:51.800 --> 00:07:56.279 and there's still wasn't that much competition and no one had really done it for 118 00:07:56.399 --> 00:08:00.160 chicken and so nugs and simulate, we're doing really cool stuff and they wanted 119 00:08:00.199 --> 00:08:03.920 to continue to find ways to create up their food categories that that were simulating 120 00:08:05.000 --> 00:08:07.759 a real meat. However, there's just a lot more competition today and there 121 00:08:07.839 --> 00:08:11.519 was two years ago or five years ago, and it's going to be tough. 122 00:08:11.560 --> 00:08:15.079 But I also think that. I think that there's going to be a 123 00:08:15.199 --> 00:08:20.040 shift in this next few years that customers, and I'm already starting to see 124 00:08:20.079 --> 00:08:24.279 it that they no longer just want the Ault of meat, milk, etc. 125 00:08:24.639 --> 00:08:26.720 Like they want ingredients to be a little more transparent because, you know, 126 00:08:26.759 --> 00:08:30.199 at first it was like give me impossible, give me beyond, I 127 00:08:30.199 --> 00:08:31.720 don't care, it's plant based on me, eat this. Now everyone's like, 128 00:08:31.720 --> 00:08:35.080 wait, what's the difference between these ingredients in my dog foods ingredient? 129 00:08:35.080 --> 00:08:39.960 There's what? There's fifty two ingredients in a beyond burger and it's all these 130 00:08:39.960 --> 00:08:41.679 different oils and fats and something like. What am I eating? And I 131 00:08:41.720 --> 00:08:45.559 think that's going to start to ship. So finding ways to be the R 132 00:08:45.759 --> 00:08:48.240 X bar of beyond burgers and stuff like that. But we'll see, we'll 133 00:08:48.240 --> 00:08:52.559 see what the customers wanting. I'm so glad you brought this up. Mean 134 00:08:52.600 --> 00:08:56.080 recently I had on g thin car, Theo's a founder of a human cow, 135 00:08:56.200 --> 00:09:00.399 and he was talking a bit about like what the value system is within. 136 00:09:00.519 --> 00:09:01.600 Better for you, right, it's a better for you. Is it 137 00:09:01.679 --> 00:09:07.279 better for the environment in the planet? And this notion that I think consumers 138 00:09:07.320 --> 00:09:11.639 are starting to think about. Okay, this is maybe an alternative to meet, 139 00:09:11.799 --> 00:09:15.080 or rather this is an alternative meet. Clearly better for the planet, 140 00:09:15.080 --> 00:09:18.159 there's no cows involved, has no chickens involved, what have you. But 141 00:09:18.320 --> 00:09:20.960 is it actually better for you? Right, right, and one of the 142 00:09:20.960 --> 00:09:24.720 actual ingredients and salves and how he says he always takes you knows better for 143 00:09:24.799 --> 00:09:30.200 you. That's like number one importance over anything else. So obviously you're an 144 00:09:30.240 --> 00:09:33.600 investor. You're thinking about companies. Is this maybe also how you think about 145 00:09:33.600 --> 00:09:37.120 when you're looking at ideas? Maybe have like a value system where it comes 146 00:09:37.159 --> 00:09:41.840 to what are we actually trying to accomplish here? Yeah, of course. 147 00:09:41.840 --> 00:09:45.279 I mean every brand that I'm part of is a mission driven company. They 148 00:09:45.320 --> 00:09:48.279 all start with a why? I talked about this a bunch on different podcasts 149 00:09:48.480 --> 00:09:52.240 and a bunch to tell other entrepreneurs and and, you know, funds and 150 00:09:52.279 --> 00:09:56.120 investors. A lot of people are like, wow, you have multiple winds. 151 00:09:56.279 --> 00:10:01.320 Like what's your investing Pisis? I went to business school, but I'm 152 00:10:01.360 --> 00:10:05.480 not like some x Bane Goldman Sax, you know, crunching numbers and you 153 00:10:05.519 --> 00:10:07.519 know there's people that are a hundred times smarter than me out there. For 154 00:10:07.559 --> 00:10:13.360 sure. What I'm really good at is finding companies that are mission driven, 155 00:10:13.399 --> 00:10:16.840 that have a purpose, that have a y and that are in terms selling 156 00:10:16.840 --> 00:10:20.639 a product and doesn't line up with what the trends are, what consumers are 157 00:10:20.679 --> 00:10:24.559 wanting? Is it solving a problem and if so, then I'll bet on 158 00:10:24.600 --> 00:10:26.240 it. You know, I'm not always correct, but I've been correct a 159 00:10:26.240 --> 00:10:31.120 good amount of times and we've had some pretty big wins. But it's always 160 00:10:31.480 --> 00:10:35.120 my number one thesis is always finding companies that are that are mission driven. 161 00:10:35.159 --> 00:10:37.480 You know, if we were to think about Mosh, you know, our 162 00:10:37.480 --> 00:10:39.759 company that we just started. You know our brain health well is company. 163 00:10:39.799 --> 00:10:43.600 Everyone's like, why are you guys a protein bar company? And I'm like, 164 00:10:43.639 --> 00:10:46.720 we're not. You know, the brain bar is our first product that 165 00:10:46.799 --> 00:10:50.519 we're starting, but we're a mission during company looking educate consumers about what they 166 00:10:50.559 --> 00:10:52.600 eat or what they drink impacts their brain. Help. How we're doing that 167 00:10:52.679 --> 00:10:56.080 is through our first product, which is a brain bar. Then we're going 168 00:10:56.080 --> 00:10:58.600 to continue on to doing other product lines. But that's not what we are. 169 00:10:58.639 --> 00:11:03.720 You know, and it's always is the customer that can understand your why 170 00:11:03.720 --> 00:11:05.399 and your mission. You know, that's what they buy. They don't always 171 00:11:05.440 --> 00:11:09.480 buy the what so with liquid IV or with super coffee, right, they 172 00:11:09.519 --> 00:11:13.320 were selling positivity. They were like how do we start every single person's mourning 173 00:11:13.360 --> 00:11:18.840 in the most positive and energy boosting way possible? And they're like, okay, 174 00:11:18.840 --> 00:11:20.679 well, the number one thing that's being consumed right now in the mornings 175 00:11:20.720 --> 00:11:24.799 is coffee. Right the ready to drink categories exploding and there's this new thing 176 00:11:24.840 --> 00:11:28.559 called cold brew and starbucks has the absolute choke hold on it. And number 177 00:11:28.559 --> 00:11:31.720 two is dunk and donuets, and then monster three. All those people have 178 00:11:31.840 --> 00:11:35.279 thirty grams plus of sugar and their morning drink. That's slowing people down, 179 00:11:35.360 --> 00:11:39.759 is making them sluggish, less productive, etc. How do we create a 180 00:11:39.759 --> 00:11:43.399 more positive morning? Let's take away the sugar and keep the taste and bottle 181 00:11:43.480 --> 00:11:46.080 that. And that's what they did. So it was a mission driven thing. 182 00:11:46.159 --> 00:11:48.919 First they had a why and then they created the product. You know, 183 00:11:48.159 --> 00:11:52.320 that's probably the number one core thesis of what I like to try to 184 00:11:52.320 --> 00:11:54.519 invest on. Yeah, now that's really helpful. How do you also think 185 00:11:54.559 --> 00:11:58.960 about separation when you're analyzing? You know not to come to you your analyze 186 00:12:00.039 --> 00:12:05.080 in the category. How do you think about branded differentiation verse product differentiation? 187 00:12:05.120 --> 00:12:09.799 Does it brand have to have both? Look, branding is everything. You 188 00:12:09.840 --> 00:12:13.840 know marketing is everything, but to me. The products gotta be something's got 189 00:12:13.840 --> 00:12:18.480 to be unique or differentiated or different, and I think that a company that 190 00:12:18.519 --> 00:12:22.279 did genius marketing. You know, something like Smart Water Sus same thing essentially. 191 00:12:22.279 --> 00:12:26.600 In the end of the day it's a water or ascentia. They did 192 00:12:26.600 --> 00:12:31.279 a great job by making the nine ph which was a new differentiated factor, 193 00:12:31.360 --> 00:12:35.120 but, you know, vy on stuff like that, it's just more premium. 194 00:12:35.120 --> 00:12:37.519 You know, I guess you could argue the sources different and how they 195 00:12:37.679 --> 00:12:39.799 create the water, but in the end of the day it's it's water or 196 00:12:39.840 --> 00:12:45.519 like liquid death. Liquid death is absolutely genius. I mean that's to pure 197 00:12:45.519 --> 00:12:48.200 marketing play, right. I mean that's the making, the fun of it, 198 00:12:48.240 --> 00:12:54.320 the branding, the messaging, the the core consumer. That's yeah, 199 00:12:54.360 --> 00:12:58.039 it's water. So that works. You know, that definitely works and you 200 00:12:58.039 --> 00:13:01.039 know we've seen that with tons of different drinks and foods, from, you 201 00:13:01.039 --> 00:13:03.279 know, especially in the spirit space, to vodka and stuff. That used 202 00:13:03.279 --> 00:13:05.759 to work all the time. Let's just take the cheapest, you know, 203 00:13:05.840 --> 00:13:11.039 Vodka company possible, use their product and rebranded and sell it for ninety dollars 204 00:13:11.240 --> 00:13:15.279 and the consumer will think it's way higher value, a way, you know, 205 00:13:15.399 --> 00:13:18.480 perception wise, it's way better for me. I try to find stuff 206 00:13:18.519 --> 00:13:20.679 that's a little more unique and different in the in the terms of the actual 207 00:13:20.799 --> 00:13:24.600 product and ingredients, you know. You know, when it comes to super 208 00:13:24.639 --> 00:13:28.679 coffee, no one had done a no sugar rarity to drink cold brew that 209 00:13:28.720 --> 00:13:31.840 tastes like a bit ill of frappic that with liquid IV, no one was 210 00:13:31.879 --> 00:13:35.039 doing drinks and little satchets that you pour into your for water with half the 211 00:13:35.039 --> 00:13:39.039 amount of sugar as body armor or Gatorade. You know, that wasn't around. 212 00:13:39.080 --> 00:13:43.600 The same with nugs. No one was doing these, the plant based 213 00:13:43.679 --> 00:13:46.200 version of a chicken nugget at the time. So on. So for it. 214 00:13:46.360 --> 00:13:50.960 So those things are a little bit different, but you know, Kudos 215 00:13:50.960 --> 00:13:52.799 to the people that have done it that way. Of the Liquid de I 216 00:13:52.879 --> 00:13:56.759 mean I look up to them. It's a something to be studied in marketing 217 00:13:56.879 --> 00:14:01.759 schools and branding totally. So it's fair to say that in order to kind 218 00:14:01.759 --> 00:14:05.159 of Peek your interest in a company, there has to be some type of 219 00:14:05.399 --> 00:14:09.720 product innovation or the product has to really bring something to the category. Yeah, 220 00:14:09.799 --> 00:14:13.759 yes, something that's a little bit unique or different, you know. 221 00:14:13.080 --> 00:14:18.559 I mean doesn't have to be reinventing the whole wheel of making, you know, 222 00:14:18.759 --> 00:14:20.480 a fake chicken thide. But I'm just saying it's, you know, 223 00:14:20.519 --> 00:14:24.320 it's got to be something that I would personally get, that I think consumers 224 00:14:24.320 --> 00:14:30.320 would, that's following the trend etc. Are there particular categories that you think 225 00:14:30.360 --> 00:14:33.919 still early and you're very excited about? Maybe we're like nugs was, you 226 00:14:33.960 --> 00:14:37.480 know, two years ago per se. Yeah, I mean, look, 227 00:14:37.519 --> 00:14:41.200 I think that the I've done some stuff in the fitness text base. The 228 00:14:41.200 --> 00:14:46.559 wearable whoop is one of the I'm an investor in whoop for just over two 229 00:14:46.600 --> 00:14:50.039 years now. Looked I mean you could argue they are not reinventing the wheel, 230 00:14:50.039 --> 00:14:54.120 that there was fitbits and other wearable things, you know, the years 231 00:14:54.120 --> 00:14:58.000 prior to that, but I think that they integrated a really great APP and 232 00:14:58.039 --> 00:15:03.799 the great interface and a lot more attention to detail of things that customers were 233 00:15:03.399 --> 00:15:09.159 we're looking for like sleep and readiness and and how to optimize body performance and 234 00:15:09.200 --> 00:15:13.200 stuff. I think that the fitness space is really interesting. You know what 235 00:15:13.279 --> 00:15:16.879 Peloton did? You know, whatever your opinion is of Peloton, and you 236 00:15:16.919 --> 00:15:20.399 know where it's gone today and in the past. The roller coaster ride it's 237 00:15:20.440 --> 00:15:24.279 Tad the last twenty four months, but you know, I think it pioneered 238 00:15:24.279 --> 00:15:28.840 to think of allowing people to work out at home again and prioritizing time and 239 00:15:28.879 --> 00:15:33.360 commitment and subscription model etc. And you know, tonal, I think is 240 00:15:33.360 --> 00:15:35.960 really cool, and and hydro and some other, you know, players in 241 00:15:37.000 --> 00:15:41.159 that space. I think Pelton's failed to go out in the choir or continue 242 00:15:41.399 --> 00:15:45.519 to develop their product lines and and act as a growth company and they really 243 00:15:45.519 --> 00:15:48.240 just focused on one model. But I think that that space is really interesting 244 00:15:48.240 --> 00:15:52.360 because it's continued to evolve. Like when my dad was came to America, 245 00:15:52.399 --> 00:15:56.600 there were no Jim's, you know, and then he kind of pioneered the 246 00:15:56.600 --> 00:16:00.440 weightlifting and wanting to open up Jim's everywhere like starbucks. And then it became 247 00:16:00.519 --> 00:16:02.919 a difference in the s of you know, now you can put in a 248 00:16:03.000 --> 00:16:07.159 video, a vhs and watch workouts from home. And then everyone was like, 249 00:16:07.159 --> 00:16:07.840 I don't want to do that, I want to go to these things 250 00:16:07.879 --> 00:16:12.320 called soul cycles and various boot camps and do things together. And then it 251 00:16:12.320 --> 00:16:15.960 went to like luxury gyms of equinoxes and got that and then it came right 252 00:16:17.000 --> 00:16:19.639 back to working out at home with teletons. So I'm interested to see where 253 00:16:19.639 --> 00:16:22.879 that goes. And and people are trying to, you know, live healthier, 254 00:16:22.960 --> 00:16:27.919 live longer, optimize. So things like the aura ring, the whoop 255 00:16:27.960 --> 00:16:32.720 and you know levels. That's the kind of thing that tracks your food. 256 00:16:32.919 --> 00:16:37.440 I think those things are really interesting and I think it's still kind of early 257 00:16:37.559 --> 00:16:40.960 in that, in that space. But yeah, I think sleep is a 258 00:16:40.960 --> 00:16:42.519 really great guy. And then, obviously I think brain health. I think 259 00:16:42.519 --> 00:16:48.879 cognitive functionality and cognative decline and stuff to something that's being tapped into and that's 260 00:16:48.879 --> 00:16:53.279 no longer just interesting for the older demographic. You know, my mom's a 261 00:16:53.440 --> 00:16:57.519 trench. That's where it's been. You know, everyone is always not really 262 00:16:57.519 --> 00:17:00.320 cared about brain health or mental health, ease to trend soil. They were 263 00:17:00.399 --> 00:17:03.200 kind of older. But now, millennials, Gen z's, etc. People 264 00:17:03.240 --> 00:17:07.440 are, you know, getting into new tropics, getting into ways to increase 265 00:17:07.559 --> 00:17:10.799 memory, to increase focus, to how do I optimize? How do I 266 00:17:10.839 --> 00:17:14.480 optimize? So that's a space that I'm interested. That's what we're tapping into 267 00:17:14.519 --> 00:17:18.160 with wash. That's amazing. That's amazing. I think that you know it. 268 00:17:18.160 --> 00:17:22.960 It kind of brings back to your earlier point that consumers really want to 269 00:17:22.000 --> 00:17:27.160 track what gives them energy, what's the right for example, sleep of what 270 00:17:27.200 --> 00:17:30.799 you know eight sleep is doing, for example, or glucose monitoring, with 271 00:17:30.799 --> 00:17:34.240 with levels or just they want to be able to track how they can almost 272 00:17:34.240 --> 00:17:37.599 optimize their life in their day in the best way. And as well, 273 00:17:37.599 --> 00:17:41.039 that also kind of goes in as well with CPG, because you know, 274 00:17:41.079 --> 00:17:45.640 obviously your input, you're super important, or maybe the most important. What 275 00:17:45.720 --> 00:17:48.680 I'm actually in putting that maybe gives me this energy, right, and what 276 00:17:48.839 --> 00:17:51.920 was actually taking me away in right, right. So let's talk about Mash. 277 00:17:52.240 --> 00:17:57.279 Why did you decide to jump in and become an entrepreneur and how did 278 00:17:57.279 --> 00:18:00.920 you end up finding Mos with your mom? Well, it was always on 279 00:18:00.960 --> 00:18:06.759 my to do lists. Mission Board, you know, Vision Board, Dream 280 00:18:06.759 --> 00:18:10.119 thing to create a company. It was always part of the plan. The 281 00:18:10.160 --> 00:18:14.160 plan was first phase one. You know, my teenage years, the earliest 282 00:18:14.519 --> 00:18:17.000 S, I wanted to go out there and find out did this better for 283 00:18:17.079 --> 00:18:21.119 you? Help and wellness space exist. Our people creating companies in it are 284 00:18:21.200 --> 00:18:26.079 bigger corporations and companies buying people is it's something that's lucrative. Can you exit 285 00:18:26.400 --> 00:18:29.799 and our customers wanting these things. That was kind of phase one. That's, 286 00:18:29.839 --> 00:18:30.960 you know, our blaze, pizza, super coffee. Look what I 287 00:18:32.039 --> 00:18:34.440 v Nugs, you know, mud, water, etc. Etc. Etc. 288 00:18:36.079 --> 00:18:38.039 Then it was how do we take these things that we're learning through these 289 00:18:38.079 --> 00:18:41.880 different companies, through the individuals that are running these companies, the infrastructures they've 290 00:18:41.880 --> 00:18:45.279 set up, the R and D, The the operations, the COMANS, 291 00:18:45.359 --> 00:18:51.160 the supply chain, the branding, the website, all this stuff that takes 292 00:18:51.200 --> 00:18:55.039 so much time to do for so many companies, to bet these situations out. 293 00:18:55.039 --> 00:18:57.400 How can we do what we we've already learned and know, and use 294 00:18:57.480 --> 00:19:02.359 that to go and create our own companies in house and fund them in house, 295 00:19:02.400 --> 00:19:06.160 because we have that kind of advantage to ourselves to do that? So 296 00:19:06.240 --> 00:19:08.599 that was always kind of phase two and Mosh's the first of that. I 297 00:19:08.640 --> 00:19:11.920 didn't want to just go out there and create a company to create a company. 298 00:19:11.920 --> 00:19:17.200 That was never my goal. But my mom, she lost her father 299 00:19:17.279 --> 00:19:22.640 to Alzheimer's. She's been creating the the women's Alzheimer's Movement, spending money on 300 00:19:22.720 --> 00:19:26.680 research of looking into why women are two thirds of the cases of Alzheimer's, 301 00:19:26.720 --> 00:19:30.160 and a lot of it, you know, we don't say we cure anything, 302 00:19:30.160 --> 00:19:33.680 we don't say we prevent anything, but a lot of stuff came back 303 00:19:33.799 --> 00:19:38.160 to diet, the amount of sugar you were taking, the healthy fats, 304 00:19:38.200 --> 00:19:42.240 the types of ingredients you were eating and stuff like this. This brain healthy 305 00:19:42.359 --> 00:19:48.440 lifestyle and diet became a prominent discussion within the community for brain health and my 306 00:19:48.440 --> 00:19:52.880 mom had done books, documentaries, TV shows, everything, educating consumers about 307 00:19:52.960 --> 00:19:56.720 brain health and about what they were doing and their lifestyle was impacting their brain 308 00:19:56.720 --> 00:20:00.720 health. And I finally said to her, when I move home during Covid 309 00:20:00.759 --> 00:20:02.960 I was like, you know, you know all this stuff about brain up, 310 00:20:03.039 --> 00:20:04.960 you work with all these different doctors, you take these different vitamins in 311 00:20:06.000 --> 00:20:08.920 the morning, you eat the specific lifestyle of no added sugar and healthy fats 312 00:20:08.920 --> 00:20:12.640 and everything like that. Why don't you create a you know, a consumer 313 00:20:12.640 --> 00:20:17.640 brand that speaks to this? You know, there's definitely other people out there 314 00:20:17.640 --> 00:20:18.640 that want to eat like this, I want to act like this, that 315 00:20:18.759 --> 00:20:22.480 want to start thinking about brain and body health together, and you can. 316 00:20:22.519 --> 00:20:26.400 You can really do this. And she was like, I would love to, 317 00:20:26.480 --> 00:20:27.119 but I had no one wants to do this butever. And I was 318 00:20:27.160 --> 00:20:30.680 like I'll do it with you. You know, I'm home with you right 319 00:20:30.720 --> 00:20:33.240 now. We have time and I have all the resources and all edge in 320 00:20:33.279 --> 00:20:37.200 the CBG space. You have all been in the brain health and and you 321 00:20:37.240 --> 00:20:40.680 have the women's Alzheimer's Movement. We can make it amission driven D Corp and 322 00:20:40.799 --> 00:20:44.880 raise money for for Al Azheimer's and it just really checks out. You know, 323 00:20:44.920 --> 00:20:47.519 you're starting this company out of a mission, and so that's what we 324 00:20:47.559 --> 00:20:51.400 did. We put it together and of course my mom has dreams and thoughts 325 00:20:51.400 --> 00:20:55.839 of how to create this company to have twenty different product lines. But we 326 00:20:55.880 --> 00:20:59.000 wanted to start with the brain bar, because my mom starts her morning every 327 00:20:59.079 --> 00:21:03.839 day with a are. She's obsessed with bars. It's the weirdest thing and 328 00:21:03.920 --> 00:21:07.480 she's always on the go and traveling, doing going New York for the today 329 00:21:07.599 --> 00:21:11.039 show and doing speech is, and so she always carries it in her first 330 00:21:11.079 --> 00:21:12.480 so much so that she had to give it up for lent. That's what 331 00:21:12.599 --> 00:21:15.440 we made her give up, because she's addicted to bars. So I said 332 00:21:15.440 --> 00:21:18.720 you want let's start with the bar, let's start with the thing called the 333 00:21:18.759 --> 00:21:22.720 brain bar and let's put some of these ingredients you're taking in it and let's 334 00:21:22.759 --> 00:21:26.119 let's formulate it to be no added sugar and and Kido and have these high 335 00:21:26.200 --> 00:21:30.319 nutritious healthy fats from the flax seed, the cheese, the almonds and in. 336 00:21:30.440 --> 00:21:32.839 Let's do it and let's see if there's product market fit and if other 337 00:21:32.920 --> 00:21:36.039 people are interested. Yeah, I mean we launched, you know, small 338 00:21:36.119 --> 00:21:41.039 team is just us too and another person, and we launched to massive demand. 339 00:21:41.359 --> 00:21:45.160 I mean we went through our full inventory within one day of launch. 340 00:21:45.720 --> 00:21:49.400 We really launched on giving Tuesday. We sold out again on that day and 341 00:21:49.519 --> 00:21:53.880 then now we've gotten better at inventory management and we've continued to figure out ways 342 00:21:53.920 --> 00:21:59.240 to keep indentry and style. That's awesome. That's awesome. How did you 343 00:21:59.359 --> 00:22:04.480 approach formulation? And I'd imagine that you probably, since you've investing a lot 344 00:22:04.559 --> 00:22:07.640 of CPG brands, had it, had a pretty good understanding in terms of 345 00:22:07.920 --> 00:22:12.599 copacking and any manufacturing side. But would love to kind of just hear as 346 00:22:12.680 --> 00:22:17.160 well what that was like. Also, just formerly too with your mom. 347 00:22:17.599 --> 00:22:21.519 We hire brand. Yeah, so, look, I have tons of experienced 348 00:22:21.720 --> 00:22:26.200 in Coman, CPG R and D etc. I don't have any experience of 349 00:22:26.279 --> 00:22:30.920 doing that stuff during a worldwide pandemic, and that's when we started this, 350 00:22:33.200 --> 00:22:37.359 having to deal with rd but not be able to be in the same room 351 00:22:37.400 --> 00:22:41.039 where the kitchen with the RD team, having to wait for them to create 352 00:22:41.119 --> 00:22:44.119 samples then send it to us and try it. I mean that's slowed the 353 00:22:44.160 --> 00:22:48.680 process down completely. Not being able to go and do tours of the commands 354 00:22:48.720 --> 00:22:51.920 and of the kitchenets. To do this, you're putting trust into people that 355 00:22:52.000 --> 00:22:56.079 you had never met and you're comedicating like this throughs Doum all the time. 356 00:22:56.519 --> 00:23:00.960 So that process was extremely difficult. It was way slower than I had anticipated 357 00:23:02.160 --> 00:23:06.319 or wanted it to be. And then the supply chain of things was we 358 00:23:06.559 --> 00:23:11.039 saw a supply chain shortage and and cluster fuck, excuse my language, that 359 00:23:11.119 --> 00:23:14.559 we had never seen in this country for the past whatever years. You know, 360 00:23:14.720 --> 00:23:18.799 during our first production when we sold out, we had ingredients and inventory 361 00:23:18.920 --> 00:23:22.359 and packaging and stuff stuck at the ports for eight, ten, twelve weeks. 362 00:23:22.720 --> 00:23:25.240 We couldn't do anything about it. In other people were having this to 363 00:23:25.359 --> 00:23:27.680 I mean it was a topic during the on Linkedin all the time of people 364 00:23:27.720 --> 00:23:33.240 that had ingredients and other materials that were stuck and and I would talk to 365 00:23:33.319 --> 00:23:36.799 our comand and you'd be like weeks or days where we don't produce anything because 366 00:23:36.839 --> 00:23:41.119 people don't have materials. So look as budge as I've learned and everything like 367 00:23:41.279 --> 00:23:45.799 that. It was by first time going through something like that and you know, 368 00:23:45.000 --> 00:23:49.400 I got definitely more intelligent and smarter and and it's made me a better 369 00:23:49.559 --> 00:23:55.119 entrepreneur today than I was two years ago. But it wasn't as rosy as 370 00:23:55.200 --> 00:23:59.279 you would think to create a company during that time. It was a lot 371 00:23:59.400 --> 00:24:04.160 of pit balls and mess ups and speed bumps and road bumps and and Alays 372 00:24:04.319 --> 00:24:07.720 and, do you know, issues to create a company during those times. 373 00:24:08.279 --> 00:24:11.960 Right now you have the bar, but how are you thinking about other products 374 00:24:12.160 --> 00:24:15.599 that you're gonna BE LAUNCHING WITH WITH BOS? Should just kind of just almost 375 00:24:15.680 --> 00:24:18.119 just like, you know, Hughes and all that kind of fun stuff. 376 00:24:18.400 --> 00:24:22.119 Yeah, I mean how I'm thinking about it is, however, the customers 377 00:24:22.160 --> 00:24:26.559 thinking about it. You know, like we have a really strong community email 378 00:24:26.640 --> 00:24:30.640 listsms, community building platform that, you know, I want them to make 379 00:24:30.720 --> 00:24:33.599 the decisions. You know, do they want a hydration powder with brain, 380 00:24:33.799 --> 00:24:37.680 you know, nutrients and greetings, and do they want to bring gummy? 381 00:24:37.759 --> 00:24:41.079 Do they want, you know, more pills? Do they want other nut 382 00:24:41.200 --> 00:24:44.519 mixes or smack mixes that are brain healthy friendly. What do they want? 383 00:24:44.640 --> 00:24:47.720 And it helps with their sleep. Do they want things that don't have meltonain? 384 00:24:47.759 --> 00:24:51.279 Do they want things with caffeine without? What do they want? I'll 385 00:24:51.359 --> 00:24:53.440 really let them kind of dictate what we go and do. Of course we 386 00:24:53.519 --> 00:24:57.519 have ideas of where we want to go, but the beautiful thing about creating 387 00:24:57.559 --> 00:25:03.400 a company and and becoming direct consumers that you get to communicate with your followers 388 00:25:03.480 --> 00:25:07.319 like this, Marie and I get to do a video conference with thirty of 389 00:25:07.400 --> 00:25:08.680 them with our you know, our mosh pit, we call it, with 390 00:25:08.839 --> 00:25:14.359 our VIPs and the people that are always are hardcore consumers and hearing what are 391 00:25:14.400 --> 00:25:15.400 they like, what are they not like? You know, what are the 392 00:25:15.440 --> 00:25:19.680 things that they would change? Stuff like that. That's just really fun to 393 00:25:19.759 --> 00:25:25.039 get to do in the direct consumer out how are you also thinking about distribution 394 00:25:25.119 --> 00:25:29.079 as well? I know that right now you're online only and you sell out 395 00:25:29.160 --> 00:25:33.759 it seems like every day. You said you got better at an inventory management, 396 00:25:33.880 --> 00:25:36.720 which is great, because I think that what's interesting too in this time 397 00:25:36.759 --> 00:25:41.799 when it comes to distribution is, you know, the your conventional retailers as 398 00:25:41.880 --> 00:25:44.839 well, like the walmarts and the targets. They're selling a lot of better 399 00:25:44.920 --> 00:25:47.920 for you products, a lot of organic products in it. How do you 400 00:25:48.079 --> 00:25:52.079 think when you're thinking about which of the right stores for Mash or for, 401 00:25:52.319 --> 00:25:55.000 you know, other products that you want or watch? Do you have like 402 00:25:55.200 --> 00:25:57.720 a set, like kind of row map? Right now it's just direct consumer, 403 00:25:59.000 --> 00:26:03.000 build online and we have a lot of lowhanging fruit to still gobble up 404 00:26:03.160 --> 00:26:07.160 on online platforms. But look, there's benefits of going to retail. There's 405 00:26:07.160 --> 00:26:10.880 benefits of being direct consumer. The main benefit of direct consumers that you get 406 00:26:10.920 --> 00:26:14.240 to really own your audience, quote unquote, and you get to communicate with 407 00:26:14.440 --> 00:26:17.640 them. So that's what we cared about the most. We wanted to talk 408 00:26:17.759 --> 00:26:19.519 with them and see what were they enjoying or not. That's why we were 409 00:26:19.559 --> 00:26:26.440 direct consumer. Once we really understand our customer and stuff, that'll influence what 410 00:26:26.720 --> 00:26:30.240 stores do we want to go to. I doubt that Walmart makes sense for 411 00:26:30.359 --> 00:26:32.559 us. You know, does a whole foods makes sense? Sure. Does 412 00:26:32.599 --> 00:26:34.119 it a target makes sense? You know, sure, but you know, 413 00:26:34.240 --> 00:26:38.039 I'm not sure Costco Walmart. We're not ready for that in s terms of 414 00:26:38.160 --> 00:26:42.880 price sensitivity, in terms of certain ingredients we use and educating the consumer about 415 00:26:44.000 --> 00:26:47.799 them. It's just not there yet. How, also do you approach consumer 416 00:26:47.920 --> 00:26:52.480 education for Mash? Well, that's also the other most important thing about direct 417 00:26:52.559 --> 00:26:55.119 consumers. You get to educate. You know, we have a whole page 418 00:26:55.119 --> 00:26:57.400 about our ingredients. We have a whole page about our our gift back in 419 00:26:57.480 --> 00:27:03.079 about the women's dollsign that we have links to the women's Alzheimer's Movement. So 420 00:27:03.519 --> 00:27:08.039 that's one of the biggest, you know, benefits of direct consumers education platform. 421 00:27:08.440 --> 00:27:14.400 How do you also juggle being CEO? You're a very active investor and 422 00:27:14.480 --> 00:27:17.599 also an actor. I mean, like, what is your life just because 423 00:27:17.640 --> 00:27:21.279 I did imagine you have a lot of things going on. Yeah, it 424 00:27:21.519 --> 00:27:25.480 was like when we first launched, I was on set in Atlanta for this 425 00:27:25.599 --> 00:27:32.160 miniseries called steptaircase that's coming out on HBO Max May Fit, and that week 426 00:27:32.240 --> 00:27:36.079 we launched, I mean I'd never worked so much in my life. We 427 00:27:36.119 --> 00:27:37.720 were on, you know, thirteen fourteen hour film days and we were doing 428 00:27:37.839 --> 00:27:41.799 night shoots and then in the morning, when I was done filming, I 429 00:27:41.960 --> 00:27:45.240 do, you know, working on Mosh and the launch of Mosh and doing 430 00:27:45.519 --> 00:27:48.960 interviews every single hour and stuff like that, and that was tough. That 431 00:27:49.200 --> 00:27:52.799 was like a real grind. That felt like finals week of just like not 432 00:27:53.000 --> 00:27:56.279 sleeping and working on set all the time and everything, and I was like 433 00:27:56.839 --> 00:28:00.720 really drained. But the thing is with the film space is like, you 434 00:28:00.799 --> 00:28:04.519 know, you could be working every day for four months, five months, 435 00:28:04.960 --> 00:28:08.279 and then you could not be working every single day for five, six, 436 00:28:08.359 --> 00:28:11.720 seven months, right. You know, I just this this last miniseries I 437 00:28:11.799 --> 00:28:15.480 did, the staircase. I worked for seven months every day pretty much in 438 00:28:15.799 --> 00:28:22.200 Atlanta. You know, since then, January, February, March. You 439 00:28:22.279 --> 00:28:25.400 know, that's three months of not working a day on the film set. 440 00:28:25.519 --> 00:28:27.319 You know, we've had some press, we've had some behind the scene stuff, 441 00:28:27.400 --> 00:28:30.880 but you know, not so so I get to really focus, me 442 00:28:30.960 --> 00:28:34.559 dedicated towards this. So it's always kind of just like about work management, 443 00:28:34.680 --> 00:28:41.000 prioritizing certain things and finding things that are you're really passionate about because it's doesn't 444 00:28:41.000 --> 00:28:45.240 feel like work and you get to really plow through. Yeah, your last 445 00:28:45.319 --> 00:28:51.359 point absolutely what one book that's inspiety you personally and one book that's inspired you 446 00:28:51.440 --> 00:28:56.960 professionally? The number one book that I would recommend that I've completely that's changed 447 00:28:57.000 --> 00:29:03.160 a lot of my life is atomic habits by it and James Clear that's one 448 00:29:03.200 --> 00:29:07.680 of my favorite books. I mean it just it's always about habits that people 449 00:29:07.720 --> 00:29:11.559 can do and and stacking habits throughout your day that can just make you, 450 00:29:11.000 --> 00:29:15.839 you know, one percent better and the compounding interest of what that does to 451 00:29:15.960 --> 00:29:22.720 a person over time. You know, so often companies, entrepreneurs, individuals 452 00:29:22.079 --> 00:29:29.599 are so interested in the short term overnight success that they forget about what happens 453 00:29:30.119 --> 00:29:33.359 when you compound one percent interest day over day, over the course of years 454 00:29:33.440 --> 00:29:37.680 and how how much growth you can have and what that can do to you 455 00:29:37.799 --> 00:29:41.680 as an individual, to your company, etc. And he talks about all 456 00:29:41.759 --> 00:29:47.119 these different things that you can do that will impact your life in a tremendous 457 00:29:47.200 --> 00:29:51.160 way, from waking up at a certain time to doing that every single day 458 00:29:51.359 --> 00:29:53.200 to, you know, where you play certain things in your house so that 459 00:29:53.279 --> 00:29:57.559 you're more likely to do that habit. The reason behind why you're wanting to 460 00:29:57.680 --> 00:30:02.160 do those habits. Does it strike home with with the real reason of what 461 00:30:02.440 --> 00:30:04.000 the end result is that you're looking to get? I mean, there's so 462 00:30:04.119 --> 00:30:08.359 much wisdom in that in that book, but I recommend it for for everyone. 463 00:30:08.480 --> 00:30:14.519 Both personally and professional. Yeah, I'm also a huge fan of that 464 00:30:14.599 --> 00:30:17.960 book. One of my favorite points was that. Yeah, kind of believing 465 00:30:18.119 --> 00:30:22.200 that you you are that person and when you actually think about like a new 466 00:30:22.279 --> 00:30:26.640 habit, motivates might be the wrong word, because motivation kind of comes and 467 00:30:26.720 --> 00:30:30.039 goes, but it kind of gets you to do that habit because they kind 468 00:30:30.039 --> 00:30:33.039 of reinforces the fact that you are actually then like that person. Doing it 469 00:30:33.599 --> 00:30:37.680 changes your subconscious right, I mean it makes you. You know, there's 470 00:30:37.720 --> 00:30:44.079 the famous quote in there of the difference between what someone is that is quit 471 00:30:44.240 --> 00:30:48.680 drinking or quit smoking, versus someone that's trying to and the success rate of 472 00:30:48.839 --> 00:30:52.759 someone that's trying to quit smoking, you're trying to quit drinking, is extremely 473 00:30:52.960 --> 00:30:56.680 low compared to someone that, even on day one they say, Oh, 474 00:30:56.720 --> 00:31:00.400 I'm not a drinker, I'm not spoken, because they start to identify themselves 475 00:31:00.799 --> 00:31:04.039 as that new person. Yeah, that's a that's a really good example, 476 00:31:04.240 --> 00:31:10.599 really good example. My final question to you is, what's the best piece 477 00:31:10.680 --> 00:31:14.480 of advice you've received? Or could be just maybe a slogan that you kind 478 00:31:14.480 --> 00:31:18.599 of keep saying yourself over and over again? Oh, having there's plenty of 479 00:31:18.720 --> 00:31:21.880 them, but one of the main things is just kind of betting on myself. 480 00:31:22.200 --> 00:31:26.480 It's easier said than done, and a lot of the invest into you 481 00:31:26.559 --> 00:31:29.680 know, savings, into this bank for that interest and whatever, and we 482 00:31:29.720 --> 00:31:37.119 don't often invest time or money or you know things into our own better good, 483 00:31:37.200 --> 00:31:40.440 our own self. And I mean it kind of goes hand in hand 484 00:31:40.480 --> 00:31:42.200 with what we just talked about with James Clear of, you know, really 485 00:31:42.680 --> 00:31:49.119 being confident in who you're supposed to become and reminding yourself that and investing in 486 00:31:49.240 --> 00:31:52.839 that. And too often we don't do it because we're afraid of fail you 487 00:31:52.920 --> 00:31:56.680 know, we're afraid of what other people will think if we don't become that 488 00:31:56.880 --> 00:32:00.000 person, you know, and I think that's why people say I'm trying to 489 00:32:00.079 --> 00:32:05.720 become this rather than I am this, and that's that's one of the things 490 00:32:05.799 --> 00:32:07.880 that my dad always taught me growing up, and in same with my mom, 491 00:32:08.039 --> 00:32:10.799 was always be confident and in who you are and who you want to 492 00:32:10.839 --> 00:32:15.279 become and let everybody know. Yeah, I mean those are is a really 493 00:32:15.319 --> 00:32:20.799 great points and I love the tie back to James Clear wage. It's a 494 00:32:20.839 --> 00:32:23.079 great bug. Patrick. Take so much for your time. This is Super 495 00:32:23.160 --> 00:32:27.880 Fun. Yeah, man, thank you I appreciate it if you enjoyed this 496 00:32:28.000 --> 00:32:30.759 episode. I love it if you'd read a review in the apple podcast. 497 00:32:30.039 --> 00:32:34.839 You're also welcome to follow me your host Mike, on twitter at my guelb 498 00:32:34.920 --> 00:32:38.319 and also follow for episode announcements at Consumer VC. Thanks for listening, everyone,