Feb. 8, 2022

Walker Drewett (NuBrakes) - How He Started a Mobile Brake Repair Company with No Automative Experience

Walker Drewett (NuBrakes) - How He Started a Mobile Brake Repair Company with No Automative Experience

  1. Thank you Mike Ghaffary for the introduction to our guest today, Walker Drewett, CEO and founder of Nu Brakes. We want to make the brake repair process simple and frustration-free. We discussed why Walker always had his heart being an entrepreneur, the inspiration behind helping people with their cars even though he didn’t come from an automotive background, approach to scale and hiring being a first time CEO.
  2. What was your attraction to entrepreneurship?
    1. How did you become interested in cars? How did this lead to Nu Wash?
    2. What was the day-to-day operations? How did you approach growth?
    3. How did Nu Wash evolve into Nu Brakes? How did you discover the opportunity? When did you decide to make the switch? How did you think about the competitive set?
    4. How did you have to change your day-to-day operations? What was most challenging when you pivoted?
    5. How did you approach customer acquisition?
    6. How did you approach the experience
    7. 15-30% less than a dealership
    8. When did you decide to raise your first round? How were you able to raise?
    9. What were your objectives after you raised?
    10. Now lots of car companies have extended warranties for repair, how does that affect Nu Brakes?
    11. When did you decide to expand outside of Austin?
    12. What was your approach to hiring and getting people who had years and years of experience excited to work at Nu Brakes?
    13. How do you think about culture?
    14. Culture is a shared way of doing something w/ passion
    15. How did the pandemic affect your business? Did you have to make any pivots?
    16. What’s the mission and vision of Nu Brakes?
    17. What’s one thing you would change about VC?
    18. What’s one book the inspired you professionally and one book that inspired you personally?
    19. Six Tires, No Plan (Business)
    20. Extreme Ownership (Personal):
    21. What’s one piece of advice you have for founders?
Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:12.429 --> 00:00:17.030 Hello and welcome to the consumer VC. I am your host, Michael but 2 00:00:17.109 --> 00:00:21.109 and on this show we talked about the world adventure capital and innovation in both 3 00:00:21.190 --> 00:00:25.899 consumer technology and consumer products. If you're enjoying this content, you could subscribe 4 00:00:25.940 --> 00:00:30.620 to my newsletter, the consumer VC DOT sub stackcom, to get each new 5 00:00:30.660 --> 00:00:34.619 episode and more consumer news delivered straight to your inbox. Thank you, Mike 6 00:00:34.659 --> 00:00:39.369 Gafari, for the introduction to our guests today, Walker drew it, CEO 7 00:00:39.570 --> 00:00:43.530 and founder of new breaks. New Breaks wants to make the break repair process 8 00:00:43.609 --> 00:00:48.250 simple and frustration free. We discuss why Walker always had his heart dead set 9 00:00:48.369 --> 00:00:53.119 on being an entrepreneur, the inspiration behind helping people with their cars, even 10 00:00:53.240 --> 00:00:57.079 though he didn't come from an automot background, his approached to scale, and 11 00:00:57.159 --> 00:01:00.719 also how he hires being a first time CEO. Without further ADO, here's 12 00:01:00.719 --> 00:01:23.340 Walker, Walker, thank you so much for coming on the show. How 13 00:01:23.420 --> 00:01:26.299 are you, Mike? I'm doing well and it's a pleasure to be here. 14 00:01:26.299 --> 00:01:30.900 I appreciate the time. Oh, I really appreciate you taking the time, 15 00:01:30.980 --> 00:01:34.609 Walker, so let's start the very beginning. What was your initial attraction 16 00:01:34.010 --> 00:01:40.810 to entrepreneurship and my initial traction entrepreneurship started at a young age. I grew 17 00:01:40.810 --> 00:01:45.409 up in a household of entrepreneurs. My father was an entrepreneur, my mother 18 00:01:45.530 --> 00:01:48.959 was an entrepreneur as well and you know, going back to the earliest days 19 00:01:48.959 --> 00:01:53.640 of my childhood, I remember quite frequently driving the car just talking about different 20 00:01:53.680 --> 00:01:57.840 business ideas or saying hey, man, you know, our neighborhood is really 21 00:01:57.840 --> 00:02:00.680 missing this business. We could take on this opportunity, or we're missing a 22 00:02:00.760 --> 00:02:04.989 really good Mexican restaurant, like, why isn't somebody doing that? Or why 23 00:02:05.069 --> 00:02:07.949 do I still have all of these paper punch cards whenever somebody could combine them 24 00:02:07.990 --> 00:02:14.349 into a digital loyalty APP and my so my earliest passion for Action Prenewership came, 25 00:02:14.430 --> 00:02:15.699 I think, from my family and then, ultimately, whenever I got 26 00:02:15.740 --> 00:02:20.699 into high school, I started sinking my teeth into it myself. Helped to 27 00:02:21.060 --> 00:02:25.219 launch the entrepreneurship club, started a couple of small businesses while in high school, 28 00:02:25.219 --> 00:02:29.460 until we got in trouble for doing that because we were taking well, 29 00:02:29.699 --> 00:02:35.370 we were ultimately selling kids things when they are parents were sending them to school 30 00:02:35.409 --> 00:02:38.969 to donate two different fundraisers and such, and so we got we got banned 31 00:02:38.009 --> 00:02:40.889 from that. But then, you know, try starting a business when I 32 00:02:40.889 --> 00:02:45.960 was a sophomore in college and then ultimately launched new washtow new breaks back in 33 00:02:45.960 --> 00:02:47.759 two thousand and sixteen, going into my senior year. That's awesome. That's 34 00:02:47.800 --> 00:02:51.560 really cool. Yeah, we had another entrepreneur that when he was in high 35 00:02:51.560 --> 00:02:55.400 school, he also his school reprimanded him for a couple of software businesses. 36 00:02:55.439 --> 00:03:00.710 That he's heard it. So I'm you know, should be promoting exactly, 37 00:03:00.750 --> 00:03:04.229 exactly, absolutely, absolutely it should be. Should be part of the education 38 00:03:04.310 --> 00:03:07.469 system, right. That's right. So, since you were a young age, 39 00:03:07.629 --> 00:03:10.830 you are really looking at opportunities asking yourself questions. Why does it this 40 00:03:10.949 --> 00:03:15.060 exist? Why doesn't that exist? Ultimately, I guess, for your even 41 00:03:15.099 --> 00:03:21.500 though you've heard a few different businesses, what led to new wash? Yeah, 42 00:03:21.539 --> 00:03:23.939 I think it's you know, follows the same trend as the original question 43 00:03:24.020 --> 00:03:28.569 that you asked, which is what ultimately got me excited about entrepreneurship and and 44 00:03:28.729 --> 00:03:30.530 you know, in launching new wash, which is now new breaks, but 45 00:03:30.610 --> 00:03:34.770 we started out as an on demand mobile car wash market place business and what 46 00:03:34.930 --> 00:03:38.289 really inspired that was, you know, we identified an opportunity to improve the 47 00:03:38.370 --> 00:03:43.439 car care experience. And secondly, I have a passion and my team has 48 00:03:43.479 --> 00:03:47.360 a passion for creating value, of building teams, growing teams, leading teams 49 00:03:47.479 --> 00:03:52.680 and creating value for the customer. And the opportunity with new wash was to 50 00:03:52.879 --> 00:03:55.550 improve the car care experience. Our thesis with new wash from the earliest days 51 00:03:55.710 --> 00:03:59.629 was caring for your car, getting your vehicle services, a painful come for 52 00:03:59.710 --> 00:04:01.509 some experience, one that we've all come to know and have a strong distaste 53 00:04:01.509 --> 00:04:05.509 for. You know, meanwhile, expectations are continuing to rise and rise rapidly, 54 00:04:05.590 --> 00:04:11.139 from the standpoint of demanding convenience, affordability, personalization and wanting our goods 55 00:04:11.180 --> 00:04:14.740 and services readily available at our fingertips. And so we initially set out to 56 00:04:14.780 --> 00:04:17.220 attack that opportunity as it applied to car care, with the initial focus on 57 00:04:17.300 --> 00:04:23.180 the car wash business, but obviously have expanded and adjusted our focus towards maintenance 58 00:04:23.220 --> 00:04:27.290 and repairs. So before are you transition to new Breakley, what was the 59 00:04:27.370 --> 00:04:31.209 day day opps look like in your mind? And then how did it evolve 60 00:04:31.490 --> 00:04:35.490 into new breaks? Yeah, sure, so for us in our earliest days 61 00:04:35.649 --> 00:04:42.279 it was very heavy ops, very heavy operationally, and the story goes as 62 00:04:42.319 --> 00:04:46.800 myself and our early co founding team didn't have significant experience, or much at 63 00:04:46.800 --> 00:04:48.879 all in automotive, much less car Washington. So we had to actually figure 64 00:04:48.879 --> 00:04:53.949 out how to build this business from the ground up, not to mention there 65 00:04:53.990 --> 00:04:56.990 was not a whole lot of capital behind us at that point. So myself 66 00:04:57.029 --> 00:05:00.389 and our early co founding team we went out and watch the first five thousand 67 00:05:00.389 --> 00:05:01.430 cars ourselves. So, you know, we'd go to class of them in 68 00:05:01.470 --> 00:05:04.670 the morning at eight am, come home, work on the business during the 69 00:05:04.709 --> 00:05:08.620 day, figure out how do we actually build this operationally, how do we 70 00:05:08.699 --> 00:05:13.500 acquire customers? What we did initially was spent a lot of time promoting our 71 00:05:13.540 --> 00:05:17.060 services at all the high rise and midrise apartments and condos and then at night 72 00:05:17.100 --> 00:05:19.860 time, between eight am and and two am, we would go actually, 73 00:05:20.019 --> 00:05:23.490 sorry, eight pm into am, we would go out and actually watch cars 74 00:05:23.529 --> 00:05:26.569 every single night. So we did that for about the first twelve months. 75 00:05:26.850 --> 00:05:30.889 Ultimately graduated from school, worked our way out of working in the business and 76 00:05:30.209 --> 00:05:34.410 spent more time working on the business. Ultimately raises around a seed capital, 77 00:05:34.529 --> 00:05:40.399 built the team, scaled the business into another market and ultimately transition it's new 78 00:05:40.480 --> 00:05:42.560 breaks, but I think we'll get to that part of the story here in 79 00:05:42.560 --> 00:05:46.519 a few minutes. That's awesome. What was the the market that you've been 80 00:05:46.519 --> 00:05:49.790 into as at Austin? So initially launched into Austin. Ultimately expanded the Dallas 81 00:05:49.870 --> 00:05:54.910 Fort Worth meet. At this time when you're transition a a new wash to 82 00:05:54.990 --> 00:05:58.149 new breaks, you've new wash into markets. You've been Dallas and awesome. 83 00:05:58.350 --> 00:06:00.110 Did you feel like you had to take a step back and first prove yourself 84 00:06:00.149 --> 00:06:05.579 in one market, or did you initially launch into so we launched into two 85 00:06:05.620 --> 00:06:10.339 markets within the first sixty days. So from why we watching the two markets 86 00:06:10.379 --> 00:06:15.620 within the first sixty days. And what occurred was new breaks was quickly accelerating 87 00:06:15.860 --> 00:06:18.370 and was, you know, nearly the size of new wash within just a 88 00:06:18.410 --> 00:06:21.610 few months and we were actually running the businesses in parallel at that point. 89 00:06:21.730 --> 00:06:25.889 And after a few months of running new breaks in parallel with new wash, 90 00:06:26.009 --> 00:06:29.250 the car wash model was you know, then we had to take a step 91 00:06:29.250 --> 00:06:30.290 back and say, Hey, what are we really doing here? Which of 92 00:06:30.370 --> 00:06:33.920 these business lines do we believe in most? Which of these if we could, 93 00:06:33.959 --> 00:06:36.879 you know, allocate all of our resources, being our time, people 94 00:06:36.959 --> 00:06:41.279 and money, towards one of them? Which one makes the most sense and 95 00:06:41.360 --> 00:06:45.480 at that point it was very clear that maintenance and servicing was the model, 96 00:06:45.839 --> 00:06:48.389 and so we ultimately deprecated the new wash. We reallocated all of our resource 97 00:06:48.430 --> 00:06:53.589 over towards new breaks full time and and continue accelerating from there. How many 98 00:06:53.629 --> 00:06:56.910 people in those firstc days, how many like mechanics, honor repair professionals? 99 00:06:56.949 --> 00:06:59.870 How many we were you hiring? And those first sixty days, I think 100 00:06:59.949 --> 00:07:03.420 that we had around five will time service professionals, which we call technicians. 101 00:07:03.740 --> 00:07:06.660 Since you started with breaks, how many break repairs could they do in like 102 00:07:06.779 --> 00:07:10.259 one day? A single professional? Yeah, sure, you know, a 103 00:07:10.300 --> 00:07:15.379 single professional can do around somewhere between four and six repairs and a given day. 104 00:07:15.699 --> 00:07:18.569 Cool. I'm at this point when you were pivoting from new wash to 105 00:07:19.930 --> 00:07:25.410 new breaks, were you also raising capital? We were not raising capital. 106 00:07:25.449 --> 00:07:29.370 At which point we pivoted, however, within you know, about three months, 107 00:07:29.529 --> 00:07:31.959 when new breaks had accelerated quite quickly and we wanted to reallocate all of 108 00:07:32.000 --> 00:07:36.680 our resources towards growing new breaks above all else. At that point of raising 109 00:07:36.759 --> 00:07:40.839 capital or we we began that process and, you know, within about a 110 00:07:40.920 --> 00:07:44.240 month had had received a term sheet from bling capital to lead our seed round. 111 00:07:44.350 --> 00:07:46.470 That's amazing. And so what was that process like for you raising your 112 00:07:46.550 --> 00:07:50.350 see how did you go around building relationships and what we're all some of the 113 00:07:50.430 --> 00:07:55.269 reasons by investors passed out a little bit of context. Is Fortunate enough, 114 00:07:55.389 --> 00:07:58.660 even when scaling new wash, we had raised a precede round. In that 115 00:07:58.740 --> 00:08:03.660 preceed round was fortunate enough to had met our very first investor, was a 116 00:08:03.779 --> 00:08:09.100 student focused investor, student entrepreneur focused investor, and that's Eric Tarzinski from contrary 117 00:08:09.180 --> 00:08:13.569 capital. He's been a phenomenal supporter of mine and of the company and team 118 00:08:13.850 --> 00:08:18.089 and whenever we had transition and towards scaling new breaks, I'd gone back to 119 00:08:18.129 --> 00:08:22.009 our initial appreciate investors and provided them context on, you know, what we 120 00:08:22.089 --> 00:08:26.199 were ultimately doing. And at that point Eric had connected me with blank capital 121 00:08:26.480 --> 00:08:30.600 and been Ling at our let our seat round. And so for me it 122 00:08:30.680 --> 00:08:35.159 was very fortunate to come into a very, very supportive preseed investor that I 123 00:08:35.320 --> 00:08:39.879 met while going to School University of Texas, and my network has has very 124 00:08:39.919 --> 00:08:46.029 much scaled as from that node. Well, or some of your objectives after 125 00:08:46.190 --> 00:08:50.590 you raised your seed round as new breaks, was the plan? A focus 126 00:08:50.909 --> 00:08:54.190 on those two markets? And not expand to a third or was it to 127 00:08:54.509 --> 00:08:58.059 expand more offerings in terms of different services? I mean, how did you 128 00:08:58.139 --> 00:09:03.019 think about scale post seed round? The objectives where we did want to expand 129 00:09:03.019 --> 00:09:07.220 into another market. We wanted to approve our expansion model, but a very 130 00:09:07.259 --> 00:09:11.809 lightweight capital efficient expansion model. Secondly, was we wanted to grow the team 131 00:09:13.129 --> 00:09:16.409 and, more specifically, needed to bring in some operations focused folks to help 132 00:09:16.450 --> 00:09:20.649 us scale, because up to that point is, you know, myself and 133 00:09:20.730 --> 00:09:24.759 a couple of others were very heavily focused within operations, which can be pretty 134 00:09:24.799 --> 00:09:26.639 day to day rather than week to week, month to month, quarter to 135 00:09:26.679 --> 00:09:30.120 quarter, which at that point is where we needed to think a bit more 136 00:09:30.159 --> 00:09:33.480 strategically, and so we needed to build the team. We expanded into new 137 00:09:33.519 --> 00:09:37.960 markets and then ultimately just driving deeper penetration within the markets that we were in, 138 00:09:37.080 --> 00:09:41.029 and so raising our seed round over the next twelve months as we scaled 139 00:09:41.029 --> 00:09:45.710 upward as a fifteen hundred percent and growth, and so about fifteen next year 140 00:09:45.750 --> 00:09:48.230 over year growth over that period of time. So it's pretty significant growth, 141 00:09:48.309 --> 00:09:52.899 but largely just within the markets that we were operating within, which was Austin, 142 00:09:52.940 --> 00:09:56.179 Houston, Dallas. How did you think about an approach cusper acquisition, 143 00:09:56.259 --> 00:09:58.460 because, I mean I'm thinking about myself, like I would drive around if 144 00:09:58.500 --> 00:10:01.340 I want a mechanic, but of course you don't have any real estate, 145 00:10:01.379 --> 00:10:05.580 right, if that's correct, everything kind of comes to comes to the actual 146 00:10:05.620 --> 00:10:09.129 customer. What was your approach for to customer acquisition and kind of getting the 147 00:10:09.129 --> 00:10:11.450 word out? Yeah, sure, I mean, you know, certainly our 148 00:10:11.529 --> 00:10:16.529 acquisition strategy has evolved in continue to evolve over time, but naturally the earliest 149 00:10:16.529 --> 00:10:20.730 days is went to the highest converting you know, opportunities that we could find, 150 00:10:20.769 --> 00:10:24.679 which is, you know, search. Right. Perhaps you're driving around, 151 00:10:24.759 --> 00:10:26.120 but often times you're not really sure where you should go, or you 152 00:10:26.200 --> 00:10:28.960 need, you want to get a couple of quotes and you don't want to 153 00:10:28.000 --> 00:10:31.039 necessarily drive around to a bunch of different shops, and so you go to 154 00:10:31.080 --> 00:10:35.509 your friend of Google, right. And so I'm we definitely initially pretty heavily 155 00:10:35.629 --> 00:10:39.070 focus through, you know, the highest intent channel, which is search. 156 00:10:39.710 --> 00:10:45.070 Since then have brought it out quite significantly from an acquisition standpoint and you know, 157 00:10:45.149 --> 00:10:48.950 to your point is one of the challenges that that a model like ours 158 00:10:48.190 --> 00:10:52.620 takes on is that we don't have that brick and mortar acquisition channel, and 159 00:10:52.659 --> 00:10:54.980 so how do we offset, how do we compete with incumbents in the space 160 00:10:56.019 --> 00:10:58.940 whenever we don't have that medium that they do, which, you know, 161 00:10:58.980 --> 00:11:01.419 while it does come at a cost, it's not necessarily directly attributable to a 162 00:11:01.500 --> 00:11:05.690 customer acquisition costs as we might know it. Of course, as we continue 163 00:11:05.730 --> 00:11:09.370 to grow in scale, it's important that we diversify our acquisition channels. However, 164 00:11:09.409 --> 00:11:13.889 I think it's really important in a young startups earliest stays is is diversification 165 00:11:13.009 --> 00:11:18.879 and acquisition channels is actually not necessary and perhaps can be can be a significant 166 00:11:18.919 --> 00:11:22.440 distraction. If you have good lowhanging fruit, will look let's Max those out 167 00:11:22.720 --> 00:11:28.039 and parallel start thinking about or experimenting with net new channels. But otherwise squeeze 168 00:11:28.039 --> 00:11:31.519 all the juice that you can out of those earliest you know, out of 169 00:11:31.600 --> 00:11:33.629 those earliest sources. Definitely, and also, I'd imagine, if one channels, 170 00:11:33.629 --> 00:11:37.549 rookie e should me well, focus on the office. He scaling the 171 00:11:37.549 --> 00:11:39.309 channel before you move on to the next one. Correct. You talked as 172 00:11:39.350 --> 00:11:43.629 well a bit about how, when you found a new breaks, you wanted 173 00:11:43.710 --> 00:11:48.419 to you knew that was key was to control or own that customer experience and 174 00:11:48.539 --> 00:11:54.100 really that net promoter scalut score obviously a critical rising from negative to you know, 175 00:11:54.379 --> 00:11:58.220 your's the s for the the whole industry. What would you say that 176 00:11:58.860 --> 00:12:05.129 you did differently when it came to experience that other repair shops just didn't do 177 00:12:05.330 --> 00:12:07.649 or didn't think about? What do you think, like is like the secret 178 00:12:07.690 --> 00:12:11.090 sauce? Yeah, so you know, of course, people absolutely love the 179 00:12:11.129 --> 00:12:13.129 convenience. They love being able to stay at their home and get their vehicle 180 00:12:13.169 --> 00:12:16.440 worked on. They love that we do it at a really affordable price. 181 00:12:16.559 --> 00:12:20.960 In fact we're generally fifteen to thirty percent more affordable than the shop of the 182 00:12:20.000 --> 00:12:26.080 dealership. But above both the convenience and the affordability is the trust. Trust 183 00:12:26.200 --> 00:12:31.230 and transparency is the single most important value proposition that we can bring into the 184 00:12:31.269 --> 00:12:35.549 equation, because the reality is is that you don't get your vehicle worked on 185 00:12:35.710 --> 00:12:39.830 all of that frequently you're not sure what is truly needed, what is not 186 00:12:41.070 --> 00:12:43.419 needed, what is a good price versus what is a bad price, and 187 00:12:43.539 --> 00:12:48.779 so really taking the time to educate the customer and having our technicians, are 188 00:12:48.820 --> 00:12:52.580 our frontline workers at the location of the customer on their home turf, having 189 00:12:52.620 --> 00:12:56.460 an educated conversation with them about why they might need x or why they might 190 00:12:56.500 --> 00:13:00.169 need why, or, in many cases telling them that, hey, that 191 00:13:00.330 --> 00:13:03.850 recommendation that you received from, you know, the dealership or from the shop 192 00:13:03.929 --> 00:13:05.450 down the road while you were getting an oil change, for example, was 193 00:13:05.490 --> 00:13:09.850 inaccurate and in fact they were trying to sell you things that you don't actually 194 00:13:09.889 --> 00:13:13.080 need. And there's been many times in which we've called told customers exactly that. 195 00:13:13.159 --> 00:13:15.799 Hey, you don't actually need breaks right now. Call us back when 196 00:13:15.799 --> 00:13:20.320 you do, right, and so trust and transparency is the single most important 197 00:13:20.320 --> 00:13:24.639 value proposition that we can bring to the customer experience. You combine that with 198 00:13:24.759 --> 00:13:28.669 the convenience and the affordability and it certainly is a winning formula. But, 199 00:13:28.710 --> 00:13:31.629 above all else, trust and transparency. Now a lot of cars, it 200 00:13:31.789 --> 00:13:35.750 seems these days, has extended warranties, like I just bought a Subru and 201 00:13:35.830 --> 00:13:41.269 has like a crazy warranty. Does that hurt new breaks at all, since 202 00:13:41.740 --> 00:13:45.460 your competing as dealerships for obviously for main repairs, or not so much. 203 00:13:45.460 --> 00:13:50.779 Might not so much your your standard warranty, or really any warranty or extended 204 00:13:50.860 --> 00:13:56.090 warranty doesn't cover the types of services that we deliver to you. Your warranty 205 00:13:56.210 --> 00:14:01.570 is going to cover manufacture defects, parts defects. It's not going to cover 206 00:14:01.610 --> 00:14:03.330 an oil change, it's not going to cover a break repair, it's not 207 00:14:03.490 --> 00:14:09.450 going to cover your suspension needing to be revamped, and so the services that 208 00:14:09.570 --> 00:14:13.080 we offered, generally your preventive maintenance and select repairs, is not going to 209 00:14:13.120 --> 00:14:18.159 be covered within a warranty. That being said, we certainly see, you 210 00:14:18.240 --> 00:14:20.360 know, extended warranties in particular, as an opportunity for us, and what 211 00:14:20.440 --> 00:14:26.190 I mean by that is we're currently having multiple conversations with companies that offer extended 212 00:14:26.269 --> 00:14:33.389 warranties to be their service provider whereas you know, customers can a receive their 213 00:14:33.429 --> 00:14:37.190 warranty services through us, but be also it can serve as an acquisition channel 214 00:14:37.230 --> 00:14:41.460 for us to deliver those more traditional preventive maintenance services, and so we see 215 00:14:41.460 --> 00:14:46.940 it as an opportunity and not necessarily competitive dynamic. So after break, since 216 00:14:48.019 --> 00:14:50.419 that was the first high margin, since since that was the first product you 217 00:14:52.340 --> 00:14:56.970 work service that you offered, how do you go about expanding to different types 218 00:14:58.049 --> 00:15:01.009 of services and what are the current like service offerings. Yeah, sure, 219 00:15:01.049 --> 00:15:03.889 so. You know, the reality is is all art our technicians, our 220 00:15:03.929 --> 00:15:09.279 service providers are full stack mechanics. They can operate on most every aspect of 221 00:15:09.360 --> 00:15:13.159 the vehicle and so while we have historically, you know, heavily focused on 222 00:15:13.399 --> 00:15:16.600 on break repair, even more specifically for consumers, the reality is is that 223 00:15:16.679 --> 00:15:22.269 our service providers are are a fully equipped to deliver a broad set of services 224 00:15:22.350 --> 00:15:24.629 and be are are fully capable of delivering a broad set of services. And 225 00:15:24.669 --> 00:15:28.950 then what I'll say next is is the reality is is our customers want more 226 00:15:28.990 --> 00:15:31.789 from us. Right you know, whenever you get a mobile service done, 227 00:15:31.830 --> 00:15:35.620 which is oftentimes the first time that they're having a mobile service completed on their 228 00:15:35.659 --> 00:15:41.340 vehicle, because it's generally a newer customer experience, they want more. They 229 00:15:41.419 --> 00:15:45.100 don't want to have to relive going into the shop or going to the dealership 230 00:15:45.100 --> 00:15:48.500 anymore. And so our customers really for the last you know, your plus, 231 00:15:48.580 --> 00:15:50.009 have been asking us for more and you know, on one hand we've 232 00:15:50.049 --> 00:15:54.409 been very heavily focused on break repair, but on the other is more recently 233 00:15:54.450 --> 00:15:56.769 we've brought in our service offering. So we're now offering a full suite up 234 00:15:56.809 --> 00:16:00.850 preventive maintenance and repairs, everything from, you know, oil changes to batteries 235 00:16:02.009 --> 00:16:07.519 to suspension to headlights, tail lights, alternators and similar repairs. And so 236 00:16:07.919 --> 00:16:10.799 we envision a world where you never go to the shop or the dealership it 237 00:16:10.879 --> 00:16:14.039 again. And you know, as vehicles, furthermore, as vehicles continue to 238 00:16:14.080 --> 00:16:17.879 become smarter and more connected, is that your vehicle is largely telling you when 239 00:16:17.919 --> 00:16:21.669 it needs to be serviced and our service platform integrates directly into that vehicle and 240 00:16:21.990 --> 00:16:26.269 we're algorithmically predicting, managing and delivering the services that you need. That's awesome. 241 00:16:26.429 --> 00:16:27.830 That's really cool. I know we talked about hiring a little bit, 242 00:16:27.830 --> 00:16:32.070 but it would love to kind of expand on it. Since you're obviously very 243 00:16:32.110 --> 00:16:36.899 young, CEO. Your new breaks is scaling like crazy. How has been 244 00:16:37.299 --> 00:16:41.299 your approach to hiring? You know a lot more people that had a ton 245 00:16:41.379 --> 00:16:45.259 of industry experience. Of How are you able to learn them or attract them 246 00:16:45.299 --> 00:16:48.769 over to new breaks? Yeah, I think it starts with whore we actually 247 00:16:48.809 --> 00:16:51.970 looking for? What is the business need right now and where do they exist, 248 00:16:52.009 --> 00:16:53.210 where do they live? And so, you know, my starting point 249 00:16:53.250 --> 00:16:57.730 for that is is going and talking to other experience. Leaders that have perhaps 250 00:16:57.730 --> 00:17:02.440 served in that function may perhaps are a perspective candidate, perhaps they're not, 251 00:17:02.919 --> 00:17:04.759 maybe they're, for I say, a little too senior for what we might 252 00:17:04.799 --> 00:17:08.759 need right now. But in any cases, what does a successful growth marketer 253 00:17:08.960 --> 00:17:15.599 look like? What does a really successful marketplace type operations leader look like? 254 00:17:15.869 --> 00:17:18.509 Do you know anybody what has worked well and not worked well for you in 255 00:17:18.549 --> 00:17:23.390 the past, right and just trying to absorb as much knowledge as possible from 256 00:17:23.390 --> 00:17:29.230 those more experienced leaders. And what that generally leads into is is introductions to 257 00:17:29.390 --> 00:17:32.859 prospective candidates. Throughout those conversations, is what you'd start doing. You start 258 00:17:32.859 --> 00:17:36.700 establishing a baseline and reference points on who might be a really, really high 259 00:17:36.740 --> 00:17:40.420 performer, who's an a plus performer versus who's a B plus performer versus who's 260 00:17:40.420 --> 00:17:44.099 an a performer, and and combination with that is you gain a deeper understanding 261 00:17:44.180 --> 00:17:48.049 on what we actually need for the business right now. And so I think 262 00:17:48.049 --> 00:17:52.210 that that's kind of the first phase, is just understanding who am I looking 263 00:17:52.329 --> 00:17:55.650 for and where might they live? Where might they exist? Can I get 264 00:17:55.690 --> 00:17:59.519 connected to them? And then you know, once you start actually getting engaged 265 00:17:59.559 --> 00:18:03.400 in having those conversations. It's ultimately about communicating what success in the role looks 266 00:18:03.440 --> 00:18:07.039 like, communicating what the vision is, first and foremost, what the vision 267 00:18:07.079 --> 00:18:10.880 is for the company. What are we ultimately trying to accomplish? What do 268 00:18:11.039 --> 00:18:14.710 we believe if we have success, what will become true? And I think 269 00:18:14.750 --> 00:18:17.829 it's incredibly important for a you know, a founder CEO to be able to 270 00:18:17.869 --> 00:18:22.390 communicate just that, because the reality is is we're hiring more experience leaders. 271 00:18:22.390 --> 00:18:26.230 It's not our job to tell them how to do things. It's it is 272 00:18:26.349 --> 00:18:29.940 within our, you know, job to help identify the problems that need to 273 00:18:30.019 --> 00:18:33.500 be solved, but not necessarily how to solve them, and so I think 274 00:18:33.539 --> 00:18:36.220 that that's, you know, key for the most senior leaders is to communicate 275 00:18:36.259 --> 00:18:38.339 the vision and communicate what needs to be solved, but allow them to do 276 00:18:38.500 --> 00:18:41.890 the problem solving and sure that they're properly resourced and supported and doing so. 277 00:18:42.690 --> 00:18:47.009 Yeah, that's a really good thought to especially like the fact that there's your 278 00:18:47.049 --> 00:18:51.369 mission and vision actually aligned with what they are looking to achieve as well and 279 00:18:51.490 --> 00:18:55.410 get out of it. What's also your approach to, you know, building 280 00:18:55.490 --> 00:18:57.799 culture, especially when you since it's quite spread out. I mean I never 281 00:18:57.839 --> 00:19:02.680 lived in covid times, but you're in different cities. What has s CEO? 282 00:19:02.960 --> 00:19:07.079 What's been your kind of ways? You're able to build culture through your 283 00:19:07.160 --> 00:19:08.400 team. When? When your team is going to be, you know, 284 00:19:08.480 --> 00:19:12.670 all of North America? Yeah, you know, I think that culture will 285 00:19:12.670 --> 00:19:17.750 be defined no matter what. It will either be defined intentionally or unintentionally, 286 00:19:17.789 --> 00:19:21.549 and obviously we want to be incredibly intentional with the with the culture that we 287 00:19:21.630 --> 00:19:25.099 are building and cultivating. And so the way that I think about culture is 288 00:19:25.380 --> 00:19:27.299 culture is a shared way of doing things with a passion and, you know, 289 00:19:27.380 --> 00:19:32.220 truly it's the foundation for a company. It's what enables us to move 290 00:19:32.380 --> 00:19:34.940 at a really fast pace with with, frankly, limited structure, and early 291 00:19:34.980 --> 00:19:38.930 stage company is going to have less structure and culture kind of serves as the 292 00:19:40.049 --> 00:19:42.170 glue that that holds that together. And when we have a strong culture, 293 00:19:42.210 --> 00:19:48.009 we need less rules, we need less process because there's there's inherent trust and 294 00:19:48.170 --> 00:19:52.250 the team and a mutual understanding of how white we might be expected to do 295 00:19:52.450 --> 00:19:56.039 things. You know, I think Brian Chesky, the CEO of AIRBNB, 296 00:19:56.839 --> 00:20:00.039 related it to the idea of a family. A family doesn't necessarily need to 297 00:20:00.119 --> 00:20:03.839 have a whole lot of rules and processes. They kind of and naturally and 298 00:20:03.960 --> 00:20:07.230 sync with one another and can move quickly. Building and defining a strong culture 299 00:20:07.630 --> 00:20:11.269 produces that same type of environment. And so you know, for us one 300 00:20:11.309 --> 00:20:15.269 of the key aspects of defining our culture is is through our core values. 301 00:20:15.710 --> 00:20:19.190 Now, core values and itself, words on a board or words in a 302 00:20:19.269 --> 00:20:25.940 deck aren't sufficient, but more importantly, core values help to outline or transcribe 303 00:20:26.099 --> 00:20:30.099 the unwritten rules that are now written. It is more or less describes our 304 00:20:30.180 --> 00:20:34.809 modus operandi, how we are expected to do and make decisions when when nobody 305 00:20:34.890 --> 00:20:38.089 is looking for us, which we talk about them. It's not just words 306 00:20:38.130 --> 00:20:41.930 on a board or words in a deck. We talked about them daily. 307 00:20:41.009 --> 00:20:44.849 We talk about them at our all hands, when we give shoutouts to our 308 00:20:44.849 --> 00:20:47.289 team members, you not only you know, shout out to the team member 309 00:20:47.369 --> 00:20:51.440 on what they did, but what core value did they actually live out right? 310 00:20:52.000 --> 00:20:55.640 And let's bring those to life every single day. And and so we 311 00:20:55.720 --> 00:20:59.039 talk about them quite frequently. We oftentimes say that we hire, fire and 312 00:20:59.119 --> 00:21:03.519 promote based on culture. And so culture is the foundation to the company and 313 00:21:03.839 --> 00:21:07.470 and without it we will not be successful. I appreciate all those thoughts, 314 00:21:07.509 --> 00:21:08.589 as well as how you think about it as a family, where you have 315 00:21:08.670 --> 00:21:14.269 maybe like guidelines, but at the same time it's not micromanaging or what have 316 00:21:14.390 --> 00:21:18.700 you, and so that makes let of sense. I know obviously AAA's very 317 00:21:18.740 --> 00:21:21.099 different, but I'm just thinking myself as a consumer, like, when my 318 00:21:21.299 --> 00:21:26.019 battery dies, I'll call AAA and TRIPLA will come and and repair my battery. 319 00:21:26.380 --> 00:21:29.740 I know that AAA, I don't presume they do breaks and obviously all 320 00:21:29.779 --> 00:21:33.490 the services that you do, but how do you position yourself against to someone 321 00:21:33.569 --> 00:21:37.650 like me that you know might use Appalla just when I actually do need at 322 00:21:37.690 --> 00:21:41.170 least like a battery change? It's important to think about where we may be 323 00:21:41.369 --> 00:21:47.279 actually acquiring that customer. Right it's less likely that we may acquire a customer 324 00:21:47.359 --> 00:21:49.039 because they need a battery change, although it's possible. Perhaps you're not a 325 00:21:49.079 --> 00:21:53.559 AAA member, but the way that we think about it is they're particularly unique 326 00:21:53.599 --> 00:21:59.359 points in a customers car management experience, as we might call it, that 327 00:22:00.119 --> 00:22:03.509 make themselves readily accessible and available to be acquired and then, once week, 328 00:22:03.549 --> 00:22:07.349 once we acquire them, once we get them into our ECO a system and 329 00:22:07.390 --> 00:22:11.349 show them an amazing customer experience. We can be there go to provider for 330 00:22:11.470 --> 00:22:14.190 all things car care, and so perhaps, you know, you get an 331 00:22:14.190 --> 00:22:17.059 oil change from us, perhaps you get a break repair from us or a 332 00:22:17.180 --> 00:22:19.380 similar service, right, and then at that point you've got a trusted provider 333 00:22:19.460 --> 00:22:22.940 and perhaps you don't need aaa anymore. Or instead of calling AAA, you 334 00:22:23.059 --> 00:22:26.019 think I'm going to call new breaks, right, and so I think that, 335 00:22:26.940 --> 00:22:30.170 you know, in comparison to Apaa, that's how we might think about 336 00:22:30.170 --> 00:22:34.009 it. We aren't necessarily a roadside assistance company. We don't know owing but 337 00:22:34.410 --> 00:22:37.609 we can, you know, create some of the similar convenience at AAA does. 338 00:22:38.289 --> 00:22:41.089 Got It. It makes a lot of sense in terms of just how 339 00:22:41.089 --> 00:22:44.400 you think about the actual cusper to acquisition and as well as the type of 340 00:22:44.519 --> 00:22:48.279 customer that when new breaks would be top of mine for them and and maybe 341 00:22:48.400 --> 00:22:52.519 when it wouldn't be a top of mine. So that it makes, let 342 00:22:52.559 --> 00:22:56.920 us sense. So talk to see about like the future. What's your what's 343 00:22:57.559 --> 00:23:00.430 what's the mission of new breaks? How many markets are you currently in and 344 00:23:00.509 --> 00:23:03.230 the kind of what's like the expansion? How are you looking to expand? 345 00:23:03.710 --> 00:23:07.670 Yeah, sure, so you know, our mission is, which we talked 346 00:23:07.670 --> 00:23:11.430 about quite frequently, and I think this is also a key part of cultivating 347 00:23:11.430 --> 00:23:14.019 and building that culture. But our mission is we want to become the most 348 00:23:14.099 --> 00:23:17.259 love, trusted, reliable company in car care. You know, and I'm 349 00:23:17.259 --> 00:23:18.619 proud to say I think if you ask every single person on our team what 350 00:23:18.779 --> 00:23:22.660 is our mission, that recite that directly back to you. We want to 351 00:23:22.740 --> 00:23:26.859 become the most loved, trusted, reliable company in car care. Our our 352 00:23:26.940 --> 00:23:30.690 vision is, you know, ultimately we envision a world where a vehicle operator, 353 00:23:30.730 --> 00:23:33.970 whether it be a consumer or a fleet operator, never steps shop into 354 00:23:34.170 --> 00:23:40.609 a never steps foot into a shop or a dealership again, whereas those services 355 00:23:40.650 --> 00:23:42.559 are delivered on site, wherever you might be. Secondly, is that your 356 00:23:42.599 --> 00:23:47.400 vehicle largely takes care of its self. Right now, one of the one 357 00:23:47.440 --> 00:23:49.599 of the secular trends that our business is a response to is is a connected 358 00:23:49.640 --> 00:23:55.640 vehicles, connected vehicle technology. Right now, fifty percent of new vehicles are 359 00:23:55.710 --> 00:23:59.710 are quote unquote, connected. By two thousand ninety five percent of vehicles are 360 00:23:59.710 --> 00:24:03.470 quote unquote connected, and what we mean by connected is that your vehicle is 361 00:24:03.509 --> 00:24:11.900 actually communicating with other vehicles, it's driver or surrounding infrastructure, and one of 362 00:24:11.940 --> 00:24:15.299 the key aspects of vehicle ownership that is going to be fundamentally changed as a 363 00:24:15.380 --> 00:24:22.339 byproduct of connected vehicles is maintenance and servicing, because, as I mentioned earlier, 364 00:24:22.460 --> 00:24:27.210 is we're building technology that actually integrates directly into your vehicle and so that 365 00:24:27.329 --> 00:24:32.170 we can monitor your vehicles maintenance and service needs in real time and we can 366 00:24:32.210 --> 00:24:36.130 actually proactively tell you when you need to be serviced. And so you can 367 00:24:36.170 --> 00:24:38.559 imagine a world where, you know, you get a push notification on your 368 00:24:38.599 --> 00:24:41.279 phone saying Hey, Mike, you're due for an oil change in a hundred 369 00:24:41.359 --> 00:24:45.519 miles, swipe right, click confirm and our trusted service provider will show up 370 00:24:45.519 --> 00:24:48.759 and deliver that, you know, on site, wherever you might be. 371 00:24:48.480 --> 00:24:52.750 So that's ultimately the experience and then the platform that we are building. Now 372 00:24:52.789 --> 00:24:56.750 in terms of, more tactically, what our expansion plans are is, as 373 00:24:56.789 --> 00:25:02.230 I mentioned, we are, you know, we had an initial focus on 374 00:25:02.750 --> 00:25:04.710 break or pair. We've now brought in our service offering to a complete, 375 00:25:06.430 --> 00:25:11.220 full suite of preventative maintenance and repair services. Were currently operating in eight markets 376 00:25:11.259 --> 00:25:17.099 across four different states, with the expectation that will double our footprint this year. 377 00:25:18.140 --> 00:25:22.809 You know, reaching more of a national footprint. And then, in 378 00:25:22.849 --> 00:25:27.410 addition to servicing, to serving the consumer, the consumer customers, we're also 379 00:25:27.490 --> 00:25:34.410 very aggressively investing into supporting our fleet customers. So your fleet operators. That 380 00:25:34.450 --> 00:25:37.960 might be an Amazon delivery company, might be an HVAC or plumbing company, 381 00:25:38.039 --> 00:25:41.319 it might be, you know, some other form of a delivery company, 382 00:25:41.359 --> 00:25:45.839 which are all all of those. That company segment is all accelerating on the 383 00:25:45.880 --> 00:25:49.349 back of the direct to consumer trend, which has, you know, only 384 00:25:49.390 --> 00:25:53.750 had gasoline poured on it as a byproduct of Covid, and so we are 385 00:25:53.829 --> 00:25:57.829 not only building to support the consumer customer but also the fleet customer as we 386 00:25:57.910 --> 00:26:02.670 build out our connected vehicle service platform. That's awesome things. So much for 387 00:26:03.069 --> 00:26:04.299 sharing that and I think that. But I think it's also interesting too, 388 00:26:04.660 --> 00:26:08.740 because I'd imagine during covid you probably saw like it. People probably were searching 389 00:26:08.819 --> 00:26:14.740 up more online for maintenance repair, but also that they definitely wanted probably delivered 390 00:26:14.859 --> 00:26:18.609 to them, actually have them main jappair on site versus, you know, 391 00:26:18.690 --> 00:26:21.490 going back and doing it at a natural shop, and I think that that 392 00:26:21.609 --> 00:26:25.250 what's interesting about it is that actually seemed as pretty sticky, whereas you know, 393 00:26:25.490 --> 00:26:29.569 I talked to a lot of digitator brands. Some people do like shopping 394 00:26:29.650 --> 00:26:32.609 online their groceries, but by other people actually do like the going to the 395 00:26:32.690 --> 00:26:36.359 store, feeling a sense of like touch and feel for groceries and, you 396 00:26:36.440 --> 00:26:40.079 know, actually actually top of the grocery store, whereas I don't think that 397 00:26:40.200 --> 00:26:42.119 people are going to be like, Oh, I just had this experience of 398 00:26:42.160 --> 00:26:45.200 new breaks, I definitely want to go back to actually take my car into 399 00:26:45.240 --> 00:26:48.470 the shop. That makes sense, totally makes sense. I certainly agree with 400 00:26:48.630 --> 00:26:53.069 you, or perhaps we all could agree, that taking your vehicle to the 401 00:26:53.150 --> 00:26:56.670 shop or to the dealership it is a painful, cumber some experience and, 402 00:26:56.789 --> 00:27:00.660 frankly, once we find a better alternative, I don't think there are any, 403 00:27:00.700 --> 00:27:03.900 mean many people, if at all, that want to relive that again. 404 00:27:04.339 --> 00:27:07.980 Totally, totally. So what's One? Both the inspired you professionally, 405 00:27:08.099 --> 00:27:12.099 one both the inspired you personally. So a book that that inspired me professionally 406 00:27:12.420 --> 00:27:18.569 is is six tires, no plan and it is effectively a biography on on 407 00:27:18.650 --> 00:27:22.369 the founder of discount tire. And you know what I took? We discount 408 00:27:22.369 --> 00:27:26.890 tires and number one tire retailer in the country by point two billion dollars. 409 00:27:26.930 --> 00:27:30.359 A year and revenue, and but what I really took away from that book 410 00:27:30.880 --> 00:27:34.839 was one of the reasons why. You know, discount tire as has actually, 411 00:27:34.839 --> 00:27:37.440 all things considered, for a brick and mortar experience, a pretty great 412 00:27:37.440 --> 00:27:42.279 customer experience. They really take care of their customers and one of the driving 413 00:27:42.359 --> 00:27:48.470 forces behind that is that discount tire from the earliest days, empowered their frontline 414 00:27:48.509 --> 00:27:52.349 workers. They empowered and incentivized them, and you know, we've taken a 415 00:27:52.390 --> 00:27:55.789 very similar approach with our service technicians. You know, our technicians are the 416 00:27:55.829 --> 00:27:57.549 lifeblood of the business. Are the ones that interface with the customer or the 417 00:27:57.579 --> 00:28:02.500 face of the brand. Our technicians or earned fifteen to twenty percent more working 418 00:28:02.539 --> 00:28:06.140 with us and they do in the traditional repair Shopp or dealership. We issue 419 00:28:06.220 --> 00:28:10.019 stock options to every single employee in our company, something that's near and dear 420 00:28:10.059 --> 00:28:12.930 to me. We want those individuals to be a part of something bigger than 421 00:28:14.089 --> 00:28:17.410 just their own job and you know, we provide them with a full suite 422 00:28:17.450 --> 00:28:22.690 of benefits that's frankly, unmashed in the industry, and so really empowering and 423 00:28:22.809 --> 00:28:26.690 supporting our frontline workers is of the utmost importance and that's one of the key 424 00:28:26.769 --> 00:28:30.640 themes that I took away from six tires, no plan, the book on 425 00:28:30.759 --> 00:28:36.079 the discount tire rise, and then from a personal standpoint, which it certainly 426 00:28:36.200 --> 00:28:38.640 is applicable to business, is extreme ownership. It's a book by Jocko will 427 00:28:38.680 --> 00:28:45.309 ink and Leaf Babin to former navy seals about leadership, and the idea of 428 00:28:45.390 --> 00:28:48.029 extreme ownership is that, ultimately, you know, everything is my responsibility and 429 00:28:48.309 --> 00:28:52.150 certainly you know from the perspective of CEO is that's the way that I see 430 00:28:52.190 --> 00:28:55.269 it. At the end of the day, whether we're successful or not successful, 431 00:28:55.740 --> 00:28:57.980 it is ultimately my responsibility. It's my responsibility to make sure that we 432 00:28:59.099 --> 00:29:02.779 are resource that we have the right team members and the right seats and that 433 00:29:02.900 --> 00:29:06.539 were properly aligned in executing and so you know, I apply that not only 434 00:29:06.579 --> 00:29:08.779 to business but also to my personal life. I appreciate that, Walker, 435 00:29:08.980 --> 00:29:12.849 you sharing both these but I don't think we've had a former guest bring up 436 00:29:12.930 --> 00:29:15.289 either of these books. I'm really excited to add you to the book list. 437 00:29:15.609 --> 00:29:18.970 My point a question to you is, what's one piece of advice you 438 00:29:18.170 --> 00:29:22.369 have for founders who are currently building? Yeah, sure, you know I'm 439 00:29:22.410 --> 00:29:26.319 gonna hijack this piece of device from the founder and CEO of whoop, the 440 00:29:26.440 --> 00:29:30.240 smart band, but I thought it was really well articulate rated and the advice 441 00:29:30.559 --> 00:29:34.039 was is, you know, as a founder CEO, is to not allow 442 00:29:34.480 --> 00:29:41.869 your personal mindset to be influenced by the company's success or struggles, because the 443 00:29:41.990 --> 00:29:45.789 reality is is that, you know, a startup is not a straight line. 444 00:29:45.829 --> 00:29:48.390 There are going to be tribes and tribulations. There's also going to be 445 00:29:48.430 --> 00:29:49.869 there's going to be highs, there's going to be lows, and it's incredibly 446 00:29:49.869 --> 00:29:56.299 important to stay even Keel and so to not judge my personal success within, 447 00:29:56.700 --> 00:30:00.420 you know, my job at CEO, by the company's performance, because that 448 00:30:00.460 --> 00:30:03.940 can be a zag and a zag and in any case we needed not be 449 00:30:03.059 --> 00:30:06.460 not too high, not too low, even key all the time. I 450 00:30:07.019 --> 00:30:08.809 love that. I love that at hey, that's excellent piece of advice. 451 00:30:10.130 --> 00:30:11.529 Walker. This has been such a pleasure. Thank you again so much for 452 00:30:11.529 --> 00:30:15.289 your time, Mike. I've enjoyed a man I appreciate the time as well. 453 00:30:15.329 --> 00:30:18.329 It's been a pleasure chat with you. Thank you, and there you 454 00:30:18.410 --> 00:30:19.890 have it. It was so fun time with Walker. I hope you all 455 00:30:19.890 --> 00:30:23.319 enjoyed as much as I did. If you enjoyed this episode, I love 456 00:30:23.400 --> 00:30:26.319 it if you'd read a review in the apple podcast. You're also welcome to 457 00:30:26.359 --> 00:30:30.599 follow me your host, Mike, on twitter at Mike Gelb, and also 458 00:30:30.680 --> 00:30:33.720 follow for episode announcements at Consumer VC. Thanks for listening, everyone,